CD REISSUE REVIEWS - January 2019

CD REISSUE REVIEWS – January 2019

THE DEELE: STREET BEAT/MATERIAL THANGZ/EYES OF A STRANGER (SOULMUSIC RECORDS)

This American outfit’s star rose during the eighties with hits like “Body Talk” and “Two Occasions” and, among other things, gave birth to a pair of rising producers Kenny “Babyface” Edmunds and Antonio “L.A.” Reid. This expanded box set of three CDs reminds us of their first three Solar albums, focusing on the extraordinary artistry of the group as they ploughed their own brand of funk and pop fusion into the lucrative market of two decades ago. I have to confess, some of it is lost on me, but what I like, I love. The Deele’s debut album “Street Beat” in 1983 carried their first hit “Body Talk” which stormed into the top three R&B listing, before crossing over to peak in Billboard’s top eighty singles chart. As an aside, the song was featured in the pilot tv programme of “Miami Vice”. “Just My Luck” and “I Surrender” were also R&B hits. Two years later, “Material Thangz” hit the shops, but failed to repeat the success of its predecessor. Nonetheless, it held credible titles, highlighting “Sweet November” as the overall prize. In 1987, “Eyes Of A Stranger” upped their game to become their most commercially successful album so far, due to a couple of exceptional singles – “Two Occasions” and “Shoot ‘Em Up Movies” – the former a top five R&B hit and crossover top ten charter; the latter peaking in the R&B top ten. Following the release of this top selling album, Babyface and L.A. Reid left The Deele to pursue other production work. However, this trio of discs, with several interesting and outstanding songs, like “I’ll Send You Roses” and “Video Villian”, and ten bonus tracks, is a must-have collection for lovers of hard-edged funk/R&B wearing a pop overcoat with an eighties’ dateline.

Rating: 8

 
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VARIOUS ARTISTS: FAME NORTHERN SOUL (KENT RECORDS)

This is an interesting release because it’s yet another dip into the Fame catalogue of rare gems. For instance, while searching for tracks, no less than thirteen Candi Staton titles were unearthed, and one such find “One More Hurt” is included here. In the same breath of excellence, another artist thrilled researchers, namely, Spencer Wiggins with “I’m At The Breaking Point” and “Holding On (To A Dying Love)” – both much-wanted by fans. Unlike Motown, who used the same backing tracks time and again on different acts, irrespective of whether any had been hits or not, Fame adopted a different approach when re-visiting songs. Their intention was to inject new ideas, and new twists of sounds, into the original tracks, resulting in a ‘new’ song entirely. And this compilation gives an insight into their way of working. Otis Clay’s take on Jimmy Hughes’ “I’m Qualified” is a good example. Club and soul favourites are here like Arthur Conley with “I Can’t Stop (No, No, No)” and Clarence Carter’s “Looking For A Fox”, spicing up the overall feel of the compilation. Fame earned respect by producing some of the classiest Southern Soul music at their Muscle Shoal studios, yet the company wasn’t afraid of standing up against, and contributing to, the music of the day delivered by other labels like Stax and, of course, Motown. Excellent, informative notes, as always, support this twenty-four tracker, which is another valuable appreciation of this remarkable company’s stylish roster of artists.
Rating: 8

 
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THE ISLEY BROTHERS THE EARLY YEARS (WIENERWORLD)

This previously released collection of songs is now available again courtesy of Wienerworld, and all but one track – “I Need Your Love” – were included on the Isley’s second studio album, “Twist & Shout” released on Wand during 1962. It appears that “I Need Your Love” is actually The Impressions, wrongly credited to the Isleys. That aside, and recognising these tracks are pre-Motown when the trio became a vital part of the magical Motown Sound, the “Twist & Shout” theme seems prevalent throughout. “Let’s Twist Again” has a sharper edge to it than the huge international seller by Chubby Checker, while “The Snake” is obviously repetitive in lyric and chorus, as it chugs along in an almost raw fashion with masses of brass which, again, is apparent across all the songs. “You Better Come Home” is a direct “Twist & Shout” clone, with the pace quickening for the somewhat frenetic “Rubber Leg Twist”. This makes tracks like “Hold On Baby” a pleasant distraction as the sharp tempo is slightly slower. The Isley Brothers would fully come into their own upon joining Motown, although while there, they suffered the fate of recording other acts’ songs. Yet, they still secured their successful niche in the charts, steering as they did, the Detroit sound that defined soul music. With their Motown tenure behind them, the best was yet to come. And that’s a whole different story.
Rating: 6