Motown Spotlight - November 2016

Motown Spotlight – November 2016

Wow! Amazingly wonderful news to start with this month which is quite a treat these days. On behalf of us all at soulmusic.com, many congratulations to Diana Ross who received a Presidential Medal of Freedom from the current President Barak Obama! She is one of 21 recipients of America’s highest civilian award which represents admirable contributions to the security or national interests of the US, world peace or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavours. Much like our honours system methinks; wonder when I’ll become a Dame which is my wildest wish. Anyway, the President said “It’s a tribute to the idea that all of us, no matter where we come from, have the opportunity to change this country for the better. From scientists, philanthropists and public servants to activists, athletes and artists, these twenty-one individuals have helped push America forward, inspiring millions of people around the world along the way.” “I am so deeply humbled to be one of the recipients….and I am truly grateful and appreciative of such a great gift” Diana responded. Other recipients included Ellen DeGeneres, Tom Hanks and the other boss, Bruce Springsteen.

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And more hugely great news, this time concerning Chris Clark! Remember last month I mentioned her song “The Ghosts Of San Francisco” featured in the movie “When The World Came To San Francisco”, was in the official selection at New York’s Jazz Festival? And a video was also posted alongside the story? Well, it won its category of Mixed Genre Jazz Festival Award! So congratulations to all concerned and especially to the lady herself who told me the people attending were from around the world, and that the intention behind this Festival is to create a place for jazz musicians and film makers to network and interact. There’s another planned for next year in New York at the Adam Clayton Powell Building. Needless to say, Chris is over the moon and then some….and so are we.

Just a little something slightly off the wall now. It probably comes as no surprise to my regulars that among my all-time musical wonders of the world is Terry Lindsey’s “It’s Over” (have now got it uploaded on to my HailshamFM playlist thanks to a like minded soul presenter Paul Orr). Well, I was reading up on said Terry, born in Romulus, Michigan, and when she decided singing was for her, she headed for Detroit where she signed with Correc-tone because she couldn’t see herself settling at Motown. “I had been there, not as an artist, but I was there” she once said. “I just decided uh-uh. The artists would go on the road and they would have no place to stay. Not only did they have no place to stay, but the company would get paid before them. They were scratching to survive and I couldn’t go through that.” To cut a long story short, when that label folded, Terry hooked up with Golden World, Motown’s biggest local rival, where under the name Theresa Lindsay she recorded “Daddy-O”/”I’ll Bet You” in September 1966. As you know, Berry Gordy purchased Golden World, whereupon Terry was offered a contract with Motown. She refused. “I didn’t want to go with (them) as all the female acts they had, the only one they were running with was Diana. I didn’t want that, just to be on the shelf, sitting there. And I wanted to study show tunes and Broadway tunes. So I went to New York. I studied stage presentation, television, how to breathe again, phrasing, everything.” And it was while she was there that producer Ed Lubunski approached her to record “It’s Over”, released by President Records during 1969. “He felt I could do something with it” she said. Do something with it? My, my, the lady turned her soul inside out and that of the listeners to deliver a passionate, awesomely emotional few minutes following a haunting introduction that’s so persistent it’s difficult to shake. Just think, if Terry had signed to Motown “It’s Over” might never have been, or would it? Interesting little tale isn’t it? Not too sure of its origin, but my thanks to whoever conducted the interview with the lady. Let’s move on….

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Although the original report about this was first announced a couple of years ago, it’s once again galloped into the public forum, so maybe this time there’s some credence to the news circulating the music business. The Temptations’ Musical based on the 1998 television mini-series about the group’s public life, with a smattering of personal stuff thrown into the mix. Suzanne de Passe was the producer of this, by the way. The only original group member Otis Williams said when the musical was first mooted that the television series was still popular and much loved. “I never would have imagined the possibilities of the Tempts’ life story going to Broadway. But it’s generic clonazepam not working wonderful.” From the news available this month, it would appear casting is about to start, and Suzanne is involved in the new project. And that’s about as much as I know, so it’ll be a case of watch this space.

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No Motown fan can have escaped the news that the Hitsville studio which stands proudly in its white and blue overcoat along West Grand Boulevard is to undergo a massive $50 million expansion that aims to transform it into a world-class tourist destination. A 50,000 square-foot project will rise around the existing museum which was, as you know, founded during 1985 and has been visited since then by countless fans, including myself. As the existing building only houses a fraction of Motown’s memorabilia, the expanding museum will doubtless showcase exhibitions drawn from private collections. Y’know, as much as I welcome change, I just so hope none of the magic will be taken from the humble little house with its “Hitsville USA” sign hanging out front.

This planned development is part of a community revitalisation in the area, alongside neighbourhood projects that includes a $110 million Henry Ford Health http://premier-pharmacy.com/ System cancer centre and a retail-residential complex. The HFHS sold a vacant plot of land on Holden Street to the Hitsville board and is expected to become a key connection road to the planned hospital. Thomas Habitz, who is the urban planning specialist working with the Henry Ford complex said “We’re overwhelmingly supportive of Motown and have been collaborating with them in the planning. There’s a co-operative synergy between the two institutions, as different as they are.” This month, Ford boosted the Motown fund with an investment of $6 million, with the company’s president Joe Hinrichs saying “We are thrilled to play a role in the next chapter of a global music icon. The enhanced museum will not only upgrade the visitor experience, it also fits with our commitment to investing in the cultural heritage of Detroit and southeast Michigan.” While the Hitsville spokeswoman, Robin Terry said “Motown and Ford Motor Company have wide and deeply connected roots. As two Detroit-born brands, they have had, and continue to have today, a transformative and profound impact on creativity and innovation around the world.” Detroit is on the up and not before time too!

Alongside all this great news, comes sadness I’m afraid. The first I heard about it was when Gloria Jones contacted me saying – “we lost Ray Singleton. She was an incredible woman.” Known as Mother Motown, I’m sure you don’t need me to elaborate but Raynoma Gordy Singleton was a pioneer of Motown’s formation. In 1958 she fell in love with ex-boxer and – I quote her words – a small-time agent named Berry Gordy, ‘a raggedy bum with a bad hairdo’. Together, they formed the Rayber Music Writing Company, followed by Tamla (their first record label), Jobete publishing and later in 1961, the Motown label itself. A multi-talented lady for sure as she wrote arrangements, sang back up vocals, fine-tuned harmonies and prepared the all-essential professional lead sheets for copyright and recording schedules. Raynoma was all things to loads of people because not only was she a hot business-minded manager and ace trouble-shooter, but was the essential creative spark and mother confessor to the fledgling record company. Her marriage to Berry Gordy produced one son, and when that ended in divorce, she married Eddie Singleton, a successful writer, producer and artist during the late fifties/early sixties working with names like Barbara Lewis. As Mrs Singleton Raynoma, she became the cornerstone of his Shrine Records label, a byword for quality soul releases.

Both Berry and Eddie credit her as being the biggest influence behind Motown’s success, as the latter told me. “The company started in her little apartment. She also plays fourteen instruments. The Motown Sound in essence stemmed from her, she even trained all the arrangers. She was the musician.” Later on, in 1970, Eddie married Motown singer Barbara Randolph, and I was lucky enough to meet them both in London during April 1989: in fact, spent a lot of time in their company which was a huge thrill for me. Sadly both are no longer with us. Anyway, in 1990 Raynoma wrote her autobiography “The Untold Story: Berry, Me And Motown” and I have to say, it’s probably the most honest read about the company and its personnel and artists that I’ve chanced to read. Certainly a lot of questions are answered and it’s a compelling read from start to finish. Don’t know if it’s still available though. Naturally, our sincere condolences go to Raynoma’s family and friends at this sad time. Also we would also like to thank her from the bottom of our hearts for her young ambitions that assisted, or spearheaded, the birth of one of the most significant record companies of our age.