Nadia Cole 2018 SoulMusic.com Interview

Nadia Cole 2018 SoulMusic.com Interview

Eighteen-year old international R&B / gospel recording artist Nadia Cole has been performing since she was five-years-old. She appeared on ” America’s Got Talent” when she was just nine along with her two equally talented brothers Michael & Avery Cole. The siblings known as Voices Of Glory rose above 100,000 contestants to finished as the top five finalists. Her very first solo single, the upbeat “Today” – produced by award-winning music man Preston Glass – has just been released via SoulMusic Records in association with Platinum Garage Recordings. In this interview with David Nathan, Nadia shares all about her surprising musical influences, her career to date and more…

CLICK HERE FOR LINKS TO HEAR “TODAY” AND TO DOWNLOAD IT

CLICK HERE FOR NADIA’S WEBSITE

 

April Reissue & Recent CD Reviews

April Reissue & Recent CD Reviews

CROWN HEIGHTS AFFAIR DANCE LADY DANCE-SURE SHOT-THINK POSITIVE (ROBINSONGS)

So here’s the deal: three albums across two CDs crammed with dance, funk and ballads. Some have full blown group vocals while others the lead singer with sympathetic support voices, but all melting together in the style so significant in the late seventies/early eighties when competition was fierce. Founded by Donnie Linton in 1967, the group from New York City had a sketchy start until their “Dreaming A Dream” in 1975 registered them as crossover US hit makers. The opening cut on this set, “Dance Lady Dance” shot into the US top twenty and hit the UK top fifty, marking their third chart entry. The guys bought to the table their own brand of disco; a rich, all-inclusive sound, almost on the verge of overflowing with horns, percussion and keyboards. Amidst the dance, the occasional ray of eloquent soul shines through. “Empty Soul Of Mine” is a good example. A strongly flavoured ballad of emotional moments that gently tug at the heart. “Heart Upside Down” is another, with its impassioned vocals against a warm, comforting musical backdrop.

To be fair, the uptempo cuts are on the ball, of the minute, bringing home a healthy blend of decisive beats and attractive hook lines that often are quite inspiring. Check out “Think Positive”, a hard hitting rap track where the repetitious, grinding pace is highlighted by vocal breaks, while “You’ve Been Gone” jogs along like a train travelling over railway tracks. Then there’s the tempo change in “I See The Light” which reminded me of Earth Wind & Fire, and “Use Your Body & Soul”, with a rap section midway through, interrupting blistering vocals over a clipped disco beat. And last but certainly not least, classic Crown Heights Affair with “You Gave Me Love”, their biggest selling UK title, hitting the top ten. Heavy, meaty dance where the high spots are the repetitive ‘whoo hoo, whoo hoo’, and I can just imagine a dancefloor crammed with jumping dancers imitating this chorus. Think I’ll join them.
Rating: 8

M.F.S.B.: THE DEFINITIVE COLLECTION (ROBINSONGS)

I can’t tell you how excited I was to finally receive this Collection because my love for this orchestra is on the same level as my feelings for the Salsoul Orchestra, which, of course, is totally reasonable. Why? Well, when M.F.S.B. fractured due to financial disagreements with Gamble & Huff, several musicians actually switched to the Salsoul Orchestra, spearheaded by Vince Montana Jr. Anyway, back to this review. A pool of thirty-plus hand-picked studio musicians who worked with Gamble & Huff in the Philadelphia Sigma Sound Studios, M.F.S.B. (an acronym of Mother, Father, Sister, Brother, in line with the spiritual views of Gamble & Huff, although another meaning was given to the initials by musicians when complimenting another’s musical expertise) were legendary in providing lush and sumptuous music for artists like Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, The Stylistics and The Spinners. Comprising a mixture of multi-talented musicians of all ages, some self-taught or classically trained – like Norman Harris, Bob Babbitt, Earl Young, Vince Montana Jr and Bobby Eli – who became household names, unlike, say, Berry Gordy’s inhouse unit because he insisted they remained nameless, despite them being responsible for the very foundation of what is known as ‘The Motown Sound’. Then, in the early seventies, M.F.S.B. thankfully became recordings artists in their own right when their second single, the theme to the US groundbreaking music show “Soul Train” was released under the title “T.S.O.P. (The Sound of Philadelphia)” with the added attraction of The Three Degrees. This timeless slice of sophisticated dance tore the international charts apart, selling over one million copies in America alone. The same combination was used again on “Love Is The Message”, another beautifully orchestrated piece, perfect in every respect, and a true legacy of the Philadelphia sound which would grow into a musical giant across the world. The song became one of the first to be inducted into the newly formed Dance Music Hall Of Fame in 2004.

So, this first “Double Definitive Collection” includes full-length versions of their biggest tracks, including “Let’s Clean Up The Ghetto” featuring the Philadelphia International All Stars. This was a project initiated by Gamble & Huff to support a five-year inner city programme, with all profits earmarked for this cause. What else? There’s “K-Jee” featured in the film and soundtrack of “Saturday Night Fever”; a semi-funk “Backstabbers”; an earthy delivery on “Family Affair”; a spiced up “Philadelphia Freedom” which go hand-in-hand with a mellow “South Philly” and a powerful disco based “Get Down With The Philly Sound”. The entire 2-CD package overflows with a musical elegance, enhanced with a dusting of classy melodies and hook lines that extend far and beyond the confines of session musicians. Whether the track is dance orientated, pulsating up tempo or dreamy ballad, the unique orchestral styling of M.F.S.B. is immediately recognisable, and it’s faultless in presentation. They are the very soul of Philadelphia. OK, I realise I’m biased but can’t help myself.
Rating: 10

HAYWOODE: ROSES: REMIXES & RARITIES (CHERRY RED RECORDS)
The gal with the crazy hairstyle and floppy straw hat! Hey, but that was the eighties. One of our precious homegrown singers, Sid remained the girl-next-door, a fab friend and a great talker, and this never changed when her star began rising with crossover hits. We met regularly, and her CBS press agent discovered it was best for our interviews to be at the close of the day because Sid and I like to party afterwards. Anyway, that aside. Released as the companion to the top selling “Arrival” reissue, Sid’s music on this double CD package has been re-mastered from original CBS tapes, and bring together a selection of her most sought after re-mixes. All from the eighties, these cover some rare sides and previously unreleased titles spanning her stay at the record company. It’s wall-to-wall dance music – pop, hi- energy, hard funk meets classic eighties disco – re-mixed by a host of influential names of the decade, like Mike Barbiero and Steve Thompson, who would later work with Whitney Houston and Aretha Franklin, among others. And their mix of “Roses”, her third single, starts this sometimes frenetic journey. “It’s funky pop and the lyric of not having a man mess me around resonated with me” she said. Her debut single “A Time Like This” here mixed by Nick Martinelli (both 7” and 12”) is quite amazing. Recorded in Philadelphia for her debut US market outing, the track was canned in preference to “Roses”. Bypassing, her second single “Single Handed”, a Detroit extended mix of “I Can’t Let You Go” – which I’ve always loved – has an amazing driving beat. “…totally re-recorded in Detroit with Bruce Nazarian and Duane Bradley it gives the song a more ‘live’ jazzy band feel” said Sid. “(Together with) the sax and piano flavoured pop-soul-funk elements that I was personally vibe with.” Interestingly, there’s a couple of groovy instrumentals here too, “You’d Better Not Fool Around” and “I Can’t Let You Go”, a pleasant diversion for sure.

Talking about “I’m Your Puppet”, Sid’s take on the James and Bobby Purify classic, she explained it was her father’s favourite tune which inspired her to record it. “Music was like food in our house…I was uber-delighted when I found out I was to record it in the home of Philly Soul and work with Nick. These memories of that trip stand out for me.” All credit to her, the song is beautifully constructed and delivered. Sid co-wrote “My Kind Of Hero”, a welcoming ballad sung with a certain commitment – “It does have a Tina Turner feel to the backing track which wasn’t intentional on my part, although she is an inspirational stage goddess for me.” Stock, Aitken and Waterman were the power behind “You’d Better Not Fool Around” which was partly re-recorded and re-mixed before hitting the public as a single. “I like the vocal melody and ‘man, get ya act together’ lyric.” It’s another full-on slice of dance, with a scorching feel and atmosphere. Then, as if that wasn’t enough, the CD, in its eye-catching packaging, closes with The Haywoode Mega-Mix comprising five belting tracks that take no prisoners. Summing up, this package is overflowing with energy, youthful enthusiasm and Sid’s total commitment to her music. And there’s more to come as a new album is in the planning stages for release this year, with a promise of UK dates. What more could we want? “Thank you from the bottom of my heart for your interest and support of my music over the years. It truly means the world to me.”
Rating: 9

NORMAN BEAKER BAND: WE SEE US LATER (WEINERWORLD)

Inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame during 2017 as a legendary blues artist, Norman Beaker wrote and produced this studio album, which I believe has previously been available digitally, and features sixteen tracks covering different styles – but all with a deep rooted blues feel. I’ve seen the Norman Beaker Band perform at my local theatre several times, both as support to Chris Farlowe and as a separate unit, where their music bounces from the stage into the standing room only audience. They really are party nights. Although Norman is deadly serious about his music, he performs with a sense of humour which he believes is a good balance between the music and old comedy, like that delivered by Tony Hancock, whom he also loves. This is openly apparent when the group perform with Chris Farlowe because they’re for ever scoring points off each other. Seriously though, Norman and the guys have toured extensively with the likes of Graham Bond, Chuck Berry and Van Morrison, and worked as session musicians for James Booker and Jack Bruce, among others. The opening track here, “Only I Got What The Other Guys Want”, sets the pace, and the journey into the world of the blues according to Norman begins. Particular highlights are “Time And Tide” featuring Steve Ellis on vocals, and “I Don’t Want A Lover” with Larry Garner supporting on vocals and guitar. Also highly recommended – the earthy “Hard To Be Somebody” and the tormented “Cheating Love”. Norman Beaker has been at the forefront of British blues for over four decades, and although the genre isn’t a particular favourite of mine, I’m grateful to him for educating me through his visits to my town.
Rating: 7

 

 

 

Otis Redding 50th Anniversary Of "(Sittin' On) The Dock Of The Bay"

Otis Redding 50th Anniversary Of “(Sittin’ On) The Dock Of The Bay”

50th Anniversary Of “(Sittin’ On) The Dock Of The Bay” – Otis Redding

Singer songwriter and SoulMusic Hall Of Fame inductee, Otis Redding was born on 9th September 1941 in Dawson, Georgia.  In 1960, he moved to Los Angeles where he began releasing singles. He returned to Georgia a year later and recorded “Shout Bamalama.”  Redding befriended guitarist Johnny Jenkins and joined his band “The Pinetoppers”. During one of Jenkins’ recording sessions at Memphis’ Stax Studios, Redding recorded a ballad he’d written titled, “These Arms of Mine”. The song quickly took off reaching number 20 on the R&B charts in 1963. What followed was the release of many hit singles, including classics “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long,” “Respect” and “Try a Little Tenderness”.

“(Sittin’ on) the Dock of the Bay” became the singer’s first million-seller and first Billboard Number One single when it was released 50 years ago. But the legendary soul singer never got to hear the finished version of his breakthrough single: He had died in a plane crash on December 10th, 1967.

Deezer’s Soul Editor Yannick Fage commented: “Like so many great talent, Otis Redding passed away too early in life, yet his contribution to soul still continues to influence us today. In honour of the 50th anniversary of ‘(Sittin’ On) The Dock Of The Bay,’ we wanted to celebrate his achievement with a special playlist that includes all of his greatest hits, as well as those of other soul legends that have filled us with so much emotion and joy.”

Deezer music streaming serviceTo commemorate 50 years since the release of “(Sittin’ on) the Dock of the Bay”, music streaming service Deezer has created two special playlists, ‘Essential Otis Redding’ and ’50 Years of Soul’

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Motown Spotlight - March 2018

Motown Spotlight – March 2018

Can it really be over fifty years ago that one of the most groundbreaking programmes was screened on prime time national television?  Well, indeed it is, and for people as young as myself, we settled in to watch an event that, in my opinion, was a first, not only for Motown fans, but the British public in general. As Rediffusion covered the  London area, and I lived in East Sussex, I needed to secure the indoor television aerial in just the right position to pick up a viewable signal.  Quite an art I can tell you, but possible. So, what am I talking about? The Sound Of Motown, screened at 9.40pm on 28 April 1965 on Associated Rediffusion Television.  To say it was the most exciting of programmes would be a total understatement. It was a dream come true, an ambition realised, and, although not recognised at the time, the programme made significant inroads into breaking down the barriers erected in the entertainment world.

So, how did it come about?  As years passed, different stories emerged but I think it’s fair to say that this is probably what happened. However, let’s backtrack for a second to another programme which, to all intents and purposes, was the launching pad for The Sound Of Motown.  On 9 August 1963, Ready Steady Go, a brand new, and innovative music programme was screened for the first time by Rediffusion. I won’t dwell too much on this because the series – which lasted until 23 December 1966 – has been well documented over the years, but suffice to say, it revolutionised the way in which music was presented to viewing audiences.  Originally filmed in the small Studio 9 in London’s Kingsway, where participating acts mimed to their songs, Ready Steady Go was later transferred to the larger Studio 5 at Wembley, enabling artists to perform live, with an orchestra tucked away somewhere which was difficult due to the layout of the studio floor.  Artists performed on different mini-stages, often in the middle of a dancing audience; occasionally from studio gantries, or from the top of a staircase. As if this wasn’t tricky enough, the ever present cameras were large with rotating lens turrets rather than zooms, and weaved around the audience, often careering into unsuspecting individuals.  But, hey, that was part of the fun and no serious damage was done. RSG was glorious organised mayhem, broadcast live, bringing into our living rooms some of the best soul music of the time, alongside the major names in popular music.

The best remembered presenters, Keith Fordyce and Cathy McGowan, steered the programme as best they could, often stumbling over their lines and presenting acts that weren’t ready to perform.  Joining them was the now solo Dusty Springfield, riding off her first hit single “I Only Want To Be With You”.  A regular visitor to the programme as a member of The Springfields, and as a member of the audience, Dusty was a Britain’s top female singer and a huge coupe for the RSG team. Besides she loved to party!  By now, of course, it was no secret that The Beatles and Dusty were avidly flying the Motown flag, mentioning the company in interviews and singing its material on live and television shows. What better ambassadors could Motown have had!  “I suppose I had a lot to do with promoting them,” Dusty once said. “I didn’t realise it at the time.  It’s only when people have told me that, including Motown people themselves.  (Motown was) running my motor so to speak, so it never occurred to me that I was doing PR for them.  I was just entranced.”

Due to her immense drawing power it was decided to give Dusty her own television programme and, as she and Martha Reeves and the Vandellas were now best friends, -after meeting up when Dusty appeared on Murray The K’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Extravaganza at New York’s Fox Theatre with a host of American acts including a Motown contingent – they were lined up to be her special guests.  This was to change, Dusty told me, when Berry Gordy planned to send his first Motown Revue to tour Britain to celebrate the opening of the Tamla Motown label during March 1965. Following a licensing deal with EMI Records, it was deemed logical to include all the touring acts with Martha and the girls. Besides it was a brilliant marketing tool to promote the new label, marking the longest free advertisement for a relatively unknown American artist roster on black and white commercial television.   The Motown Revue was to kick off at the Finsbury Park Astoria on 20 March, before hitting venues in Bristol, Cardiff, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Newcastle, Wolverhampton, among others.  Twenty-one towns in twenty-four days, with a television programme to rehearse, film and complete before they left London.  No mean feat!

Shortly after 7am on Monday, 15 March 1965, the Motown contingent arrived at London Airport on their chartered Boeing 707.  Berry Gordy’s artists were accompanied by lawyer George Schiffer, Maxine Powell, chaperones Evelyn Johnson and Ardena Johnson, road managers, assistants and hairdressers, while Berry Gordy brought his three oldest children (Hazel, Berry and Terry), his mother and father.  Carrying customised B.O.A.C. Cunard flight bags advertising the Tamla Motown label, they were all enthusiastically welcomed by members of Dave Godin’s Tamla Motown Appreciation Society.  Prior to the visit, Berry had written to Dave confirming that 15 March was a red letter day because his new label would be launched on that date. “It is as a result of such loyal and devoted efforts as yours that such an historic event is possible. All the artists and entire staff join me in thanking you for your loyal and unwavering support of Tamla Motown and its artists.”

Once everyone was settled in the Cumberland Hotel in Marylebone, meeting up with The Temptations was first for obligatory photo shoots around London’s tourist attractions. This was supervised by Motown UK’s Peter Prince and, my, how those historic visuals have remained relevant through the decades.  Almost magical. Next was free time where they explored the West End. Incidentally, The Supremes were the only group to occupy the penthouse suite next to the Gordy family, confirmed by the ladies in later press interviews. They also talked of the gifts Berry lavished on them, including diamond rings.

Anyway, back to the plot, and following hasty meetings between Dusty and Vicki Wickham, producer of Ready Steady Go, Rediffusion were asked to approve the  revised plan for the television programme.  Dusty was now to host a Motown show featuring Martha and the Vandellas, The Temptations, The Miracles, The Supremes, Stevie Wonder and The Earl Van Dyke Sextet, whose membership was the company’s finest – Jack Ashford, Eli Fontaine, Robert White, Bob Cousar, Tony Newton, led by their leader, keyboardist Earl Van Dyke.  Not surprisingly, Berry Gordy wouldn’t allow his two most valued musicians, drummer Benny Benjamin and bassist James Jamerson, to tour. They stayed in Detroit to head up the remaining musicians, to keep recording sessions flowing in the artists’ absence. Martha Reeves was happy with this new concept. She still had an ace up her sleeve.  By the way, The Temptations, who weren’t on the Revue, were already in Britain on a promotional trip, and returned to Detroit following the show’s taping. Stevie Wonder was also in town prior to the Revue arriving, while Gordy’s most in-demand soloist Marvin Gaye was unable to join them due to a serious viral infection.

Originally, called Dusty Springfield Presents The Sound Of Motown, it was during production abbreviated to The Sound Of Motown, although the concept remained untouched.  Music journalist, Bob Dawbarn, who attended the rehearsals at the Wembley studio wrote “It was the usual shambles as the fast-moving show was assembled. With artists streaking like greyhounds in and out of dressing rooms for quick costume changes and sweating cameramen given only seconds to switch from one group to the next.”   Supremes, Florence Ballard told him – “We’ve brought fourteen changes of costume on this trip. The big problem is sizes.  Finding something that we all liked, that will look right in all our sizes.”  However, Bob’s immediate impression was one of complete and polished professionalism of the participating artists which, he wrote, “makes some of our miming monsters look the rank amateurs they really are.”

The acts worked for twelve hours solid at the studio, with no retakes, singing live to pre-recorded tracks although upon viewing it did seem Earl Van Dyke’s musicians were also playing in the moment.  The studio itself was more like a large industrial yard and looking at a picture of it now, showing all the acts for the finale, there was scaffolding to one side of the studio, the audience seated on the other, with a backdrop of the artists’ names littered across the skyline of Detroit. Immediately in front of the backdrop was a raised area for the dancers which stretched from one side to the other; in front of this, the musicians, who looked out onto the huge space in front of them. On this particular picture, Martha and the Vandellas were next to The Temptations and Dusty on one side, in the middle The Miracles and Stevie Wonder, and on the other side The Supremes.  Scattered around them were cameramen, steering cumbersome equipment, varying in size.

However, although the running order was planned in advance, it became apparent that as rehearsals progressed Berry Gordy was calling the shots. Martha Reeves, who was Dusty’s first choice, noticed these changes, as she recalled in her autobiography “Dancing In The Streets”. “I took offence when Berry began moving acts around until The Supremes were in a co-starring position.  The Supremes didn’t even know Dusty but suddenly they were incorporating a cover version of Sam Cooke’s ’Shake’ to supply them material for an additional spot.”  She also commented that The Supremes’ records were just starting to sell in Britain, while she and the Vandellas had toured once before, cementing a solid fan base, therefore her group should have been awarded the extra spot.  She told Berry of her feelings and balked at his response which went along the lines of that The Supremes were on the top rung of the ladder and Martha and the Vandellas were on the lower one. “My disappointment showed clearly on my face and in my voice. As we lined up for the finale, I was directed by the producers to a spot where the camera did not reach.  Standing off to the sidelines for the finale, I must have looked real ugly because I was so sad and hurt.”

However, what Martha didn’t realise at the time, because the comments came from the television viewers, her duet with Dusty on “Wishin’ And Hopin’” was voted as one of the programme’s highlights, even to this day.  “I could see Diane in the wings eating her heart out because she hadn’t been chosen to do it,” Martha further wrote in her book. “On another number (‘Can’t Hear You No More’) we also sang backup for Dusty.”  I’ve just watched a video of “Wishin’ And Hopin’” and smiled because  Dusty is gooning around part way through the song, which I suspect, is a reaction to being plagued by nerves.  In her book “Dreamgirl”, Mary Wilson wrote that she enjoyed working with Dusty.  “Her and the crew treated each one of us like a star, but it was clear that Martha and the Vandellas were their favourites.  That was okay. I always thought there was room for all of us at the top.”

Once the cameras had rolled for the last time and the programme was in the bag, the Motowners  headed for a party hosted by singer Dana Valery in Holland Park.  There they joined Vicki, Dusty and her brother Tom, members of the Rolling Stones, Madeline Bell, Sandie Shaw, Goldie and the Gingerbreads, among others. A who’s-who in British music, all wanting to bask in Motown’s magic.

So, it’s now the evening of 28 April and The Sound Of Motown is about to start.  And one by one, we’re introduced to the Sound of Young America on a whistle-stop tour of classic songs, iconic dance routines and lifetime memories.  We salivated to Martha and the Vandellas with “Heatwave”, “Nowhere To Run”, “Dancing In The Street”;  The Supremes and “Baby Love”, “Stop! In The Name Of Love” and “Where Did Our Love Go”.  We loved The Temptations impeccable choreography while performing “My Girl”, “It’s Growing”, “The Way You Do The Things You Do”, while soaking up The Miracles’ smooth deliveries on “Ooo Baby Baby”, “You’ve Really Got A Hold On Me”. Little Stevie’s “I Call It Pretty Music But The Old People Call It The Blues” and “Kiss Me Baby” was compulsive viewing as, in one instance, he performed on top of a pedestal without falling off.  Then, before you can catch your breath or believe your eyes, the finale “Mickey’s Monkey” with all acts singing and dancing, rounded off this once-in-a-lifetime programme, in true Motown style!   “The actual sound of Tamla Motown is always distinctive and unmistakable” said Dusty at the time. “The music is light, lifting but strong..and never boring. The songs are excellent and because of this many have become standards.  The artists are as exciting as their records. All professional and knock-out performers. There’s the phenomenal Supremes, and Martha and the Vandellas.  Their ‘Heatwave’, ‘Live Wire’ and my all-time favourite ‘Dancing In The Street’ make them one of the most exciting acts I’ve ever seen.”

As time passed fans were desperate to own a copy of the programme, but nothing seemed to be available either legally or not. Dave Clark International bought the rights to the programme and it appears refused, for some reason, to make it commercially available. Then in 1985, “Ready Steady Go! Special Edition” was released, featuring The Sounds Of Motown including a clumsy insert of Marvin Gaye singing two songs, “How Sweet It Is” and “Can I Get A Witness”.  Until 2018, Dave Clark retained the rights, whereupon it was announced that BMG Rights Management had acquired ancillary rights to the whole Ready Steady Go series which I’m assuming, includes the Motown special.  Could it be a re-issue is on the horizon?

There’s much more that could be written about this extraordinary time in Motown’s British history, and the programme that’ll always remain a highlight, but I just thought an overview of how/where/when it came about might be of some interest. Sure, I realise I’ve neglected the actual Revue, so maybe we’ll get to this another time.

As always, thank you for being with me this month and, believe me,  there’s loads more coming your way this year.

Watch the entire show on YouTube…

Soul Talkin': Bettye Lavette 2018 SoulMusic.com

Soul Talkin’: Bettye Lavette 2018 SoulMusic.com

“I can sing, I know a lot of songs, I got a lot of dresses, a lot of wigs and high heel shoes!” Bettye Lavette, March 2018 on being a soul survivor, in every sense of the term

Remarkably, with five decades of recording to her credit, the indeed remarkable Bettye Lavette has actually only had full album releases with two other major labels up until now – a 1972 LP for Atco that never saw the light of day until decades later and a 1982 set for Motown.  On the famed Verve imprint, Things Have Changed is Bettye’s take on a dozen songs penned by Bob Dylan, given her own distinctive and uniquely soulful interpretation.   In this interview with SoulMusic.com founder David Nathan (who has been listening to Bettye since 1965 and interviewing her since the ’70s), the tell-it-like-it-is one-of-a-kind song stylist shares about the project and a career that has finally taken her into prominence within the last decade…

CLICK HERE TO BUY SIGNED CDS BY BETTYE 

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March Reissue & New CD Reviews

March Reissue & New CD Reviews

MICHAEL HENDERSON: TAKE ME I’M YOURS: THE BUDDAH YEARS ANTHOLOGY  (SOULMUSIC RECORDS)

Compiled by SoulMusic Records’ founder David Nathan, this is another in the celebrated anthology series, so respected by serious collectors of soul music. Here we enjoy Michigan-born Michael Henderson, talented bass guitarist of both the fusion and jazz/soul eras who – citing Motown’s James Jamerson and Bob Babbitt as his prime influences – has a history steeped in varying musical achievements.  Briefly, he paid his dues working with The Detroit Emeralds and a young Stevie Wonder after meeting the latter at Chicago’s Regal Theatre, before contributing to recording sessions at Motown with Marvin Gaye, the Four Tops and David Ruffin, among others.  Probably best known for working with the renowned jazz artist Miles Davis during the early seventies, after a chance hook up at New York’s Copacabana, Michael and Miles spent seven years together before Michael embarked upon a solo career at Buddah Records.  So, with the first track and hit “You Are My Starship”, featuring jazz drummer Norman Connors, the adventure began in establishing Michael as a bankable artist in his own right.  We’re then introduced to tracks spotlighting major singers, Phyllis Hyman, Roberta Flack and Jean Carn, which are, of course, an absolute delight. On the other hand, the pace changes as Michael hits the funk/dance market with “Wide Receiver”, with its passing reference to smoking dope, while he pulled on his working with Marvin Gaye to record “In The Night-Time”, and paid tribute to Jackie Wilson with “To Be Loved”, penned by Berry Gordy, and featuring Philadelphia International’s wonderful MFSB.  This release offers all fifteen of Michael’s US hit singles – the top five R&B charter “Take Me I’m Yours”, and crossover titles including “Be My Girl” and “I Can’t Help It” – and represents a compelling retrospective of this multi-talented guy during his tenure at Buddah Records between 1976 – 1983, where the music ranges from blistering rhythms, graceful melodies and mellow, sympathetic vocals, and all from the man who learnt to play the bass guitar because he loved James Jamerson.
Rating: 9

JONATHAN BUTLER: SARAH, SARAH: THE ANTHOLOGY (SOULMUSIC RECORDS)

Put on your pjs and settle down for a relaxing couple of hours with this highly acclaimed South African singer/composer and this anthology of his work that divides itself from scorching upbeat to deep soul ballads. And, of course, it’s the latter that instantly grabbed my attention, so with that in mind, I wrapped myself around the second CD’s music. Easing in with “One More Dance”, brimming over with undiluted soul that’s both gentle and persuasive, followed by “Say We’ll Be Together” offering a simple yet strong melody, I was basking in a glorious world of make believe. Both songs are intensely satisfying to this lady’s soul. A crass slice of synthesised funk, “There’s One Born Every Minute (I’m A Sucker For You)” interrupted my love train, but then, bam, in comes the biggie “True Love Never Fails” featuring Vanessa Bell Armstrong. Strong, intoxicating, with a vibrant blending of voices, bring home most dramatically the power of love. Draining, of course, but in a bewitching way. Thankfully, the following tracks “Melodie”, an instrumental, and “It’s So Hard To Let You Go” with its sumptuous sax break, soothe away all the previous drama and passion. Soft calypso flows through “All Grow’d Up” where the climax is a welcomed burst of support voices, and this mood follows into the little busier “Heal Our Land”; a potent statement song. Let’s not forget either the emotionally charged “Sarah, Sarah”, one of Jonathan’s biggest hits. Turning to the first CD now, where a highlight is his duet with Ruby Turner “If You’re Ready (Come Go With Me)”, their take on the Staple Singers’ classic, although the emotionally charged “Love Hurts So Bad” is my personal favourite here. With a tempo change in “I’ll Be Waiting For Your Love”, and the atmospheric and compelling “Afrika” and “7th Avenue South”, this is a well-rounded CD. The Anthology covers Jonathan’s best between 1985 – 1990 released via Jive Records, a company he joined in 1977. Combining instrumentals, with sweet soul ballads to die for, and a handful of fast hitting movers across thirty-plus tracks, this is the most satisfying afternoon I’ve spent in a long while.
Rating: 9

KAY-GEES: KEEP ON BUMPIN’ & MASTERPLAN/FIND A FRIEND/KILOWATT (ROBINSONGS)

Being protégés of Kool & the Gang, these guys were a spin-off group that forged a place for themselves in the funk/R&B singles chart. Although not nearly as successful as their mentors, the Kay-Gees did make respectable strides to generate excitement and sales in this somewhat exclusive market. Until now, my knowledge of them was next to little, so was pleasantly surprised to be treated to acceptable, occasionally outstanding music. The driving force behind the Kay-Gees was Kevin Bell, younger brother of Robert and Ronald who co-founded Kool & the Gang, so similarity between the two groups is to be expected. This double CD package covers their first trio of albums plus bonus tracks including two 12” mixes of “Kilowatt”, a mighty, powerful cannon of sound. The US R&B hits are all here, starting with their first, the party-themed “You’ve Got To Keep On Bumpin’”, the part-title of their debut album issued on the Gang label, set up by Kool and the guys to cater for their side projects, under the mother company De-Lite. The second hit, with its chanting vocals, “Master Plan” peaked in the top sixty, much lower than their first placing, while “Get Down” returned the group to the top forty, earning them their biggest selling item. The theme from the US television show “Party” was next – “Hustle Wit Every Muscle”, while the catchy, hypnotic “Waiting At The Bus Stop” was, ironically, one of their poorest sellers. Yet its striding, stimulating beat is so immediate thanks to the repetitive chorus, just begging to be bought and played over. However, it’s not all dance floor material with relentless funk beats because the semi-paced “On The Money”, preceded by a peaceful “Find A Friend (Prelude)” breaks the mood. Likewise, “Be Real”, an upbeat soul injection of sound, while “Thank You Dear Lord” has pure, layered harmonies from the band, Tomorrow’s Edition and Something Sweet. Obviously, Kool & the Gang’s influence is noticeable throughout: masses of brass, synthesiser interludes, tight harmonies, choppy guitars and mountains of likeability. It’s the group’s razor sharp approach to funk that enabled them to make a huge footprint on the dance floor, without dropping the rawness that launched them. So, if Kool & the Gang are for you, then this release will sit easily in your record collection. Me? I’m funked out!
Rating: 7

DIANE SHAW: SECOND CHANCE (MECCA RECORDS)

It’s been a long three year wait but Diane’s second album wasn’t simply released – it exploded like cannon fire into the public domain. Such was the anticipation for this album that her management was badgered for sneak previews from the day she announced she was in the studio recording it. Me included! Tell me, can there be a soul fan who hasn’t heard of Diane Shaw – our very own, home grown soul stylist who, modestly, has eclipsed many boasting the same title? I doubt it. So, how do you follow “Love, Life And Strings”, easily one of the best releases of 2015? Well, you don’t do you. You move gracefully forward with sights set upon delivering another landmark album, and by all things emotional, Diane has cracked it again. Already dominating most respected soul charts across the country, this collection of material is high octane – from the choice of songs, the music arrangements bringing out the very best from tight, sympathetic and well-honed musicians, and of course the obligatory support vocalists. The opening track “Remember Me” is cleverly paced as it strums along side stepping a deep unobtrusive rhythm, while “Through The Rain” gently weaves itself around sweeping melodies and plaintive voices; the calm feeling is almost contagious with its familiar sound. Cherry picking songs from the American soul songbook, Diane’s faultless presentation in voice and lyric interpretation is unique to her individual persona and the recognisable timbre of her voice, as she switches from ballad to uptempo with ease. Already lifted as a single, “The Day I Found Myself” gave a little insight into the pending album while not preparing us for “Shall I Wait For You” as it slowly manifested itself into a top rate soul track, nor the sultry, yet gracious “All Or Nothing”, with its impeccable sax work. This made way for a meaty, funky “I’ve Got To Feel It” complete with that recognisable rhythm which Diane loves so much, leaving the full, upbeat and brassy “Love Has No Right” – complete with hot blooded vocals – to deliver the punchiest of hook lines. With its relentless beat, the album’s title “Second Chance” easily becomes addictive, while…..Hah, I’m thinking now there’s little point in highlighting individual tracks because, quite simply, they’re all flawless – and that’s rare for someone like me with an inbuilt cynical system to admit. So, has Diane Shaw successfully followed her 2015 album? Hell yes – and then some!
Rating: 10

VARIOUS ARTISTS: THE VERY BEST OF TAPPAN ZEE RECORDS (ROBINSONGS)

Founded by keyboardist Bob James, the Tappan Zee label was named after the bridge he regularly drove over spanning the Hudson River, connecting Westchester County with the Metropolitan New York area. That aside, disc one is a welcoming mixture of blistering passion and sedate, easy listening with each track holding committed hook lines and melodies. Yet I felt the music failed to reach that ‘wow’ factor we’ve come to expect from such an articulately talented man. However, Richard Tee’s cool and soulful “Tell It Like It Is” brought a smile, likewise Mark Colby’s “On And On”. The second disc is a tad more adventurous, where mellow hits upbeat more aggressively, like Mr Tee’s funky “Jesus Children Of America” which perfectly flatters his gospel-tinged vocal cut “Every Day”. Mark Colby hits the funk edged road again with “Skat Talk, leaving “Peace Of Mind” to quieten the pace. Of Bob James himself, there’s six titles, including the somewhat reflective “Angela”, the theme from the television series “Taxi”, for which he provided all the music; “Brighton By The Sea” featuring Grover Washington Jr’s sax work, and “Westchester Lady” from his much acclaimed “Bob James 3” album. Wilbert Longmire’s “Black Is The Color” is the full length version, and his “Love’s Holiday” is a very convincing version of the Earth Wind & Fire track. Mr James is, of course, steeped in music history, from being discovered by Quincy Jones, who signed him to Mercury Records to release his first tentative step into jazz with the album “Bold Conceptions” in 1963. From here, he worked with Sarah Vaughan, Creed Taylor, and later Stanley Turrentine, among others. Cutting a long and productive story short, Bob James opened his own label, Tappan Zee, to produce some incredibly classy music, which, I’m afraid, failed to capture my interest.
Rating: 6

 

 

 

Motown Spotlight February 2018

Motown Spotlight February 2018

Before taking care of business this month, I’d like to thank those of you who contacted me regarding my piece about Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell last time. Your positive comments have inspired me to write about Marvin and his other duettists some time in the future.  Meanwhile though, one reader who asked me to share her comments was none other than Motown’s very own Chris Clark, so here goes…

“Tammi was a cheeky, spontaneous, good hearted pleasure! I ran into her at a couple of Berry Gordy’s parties, hanging out at the studio between sessions and backstage for hours between performances at the Fox shows. What I was most aware of is what she wasn’t – she wasn’t judgemental.  She had this wild, warm – I don’t know how to say it, – but it was a spiritedness.  There was a spiritual aspect to it as well. Just like Brenda Holloway.  With Tammi there was this sense of energy.  It wasn’t challenging nor competitive.  It was there, and you were open to join it, no questions asked. It’s possible different people had different reactions to it.  It’s also possible men felt compelled to tame or contain it, and they might have run into different aspects of it.  I always had the sense that she was someone I’d want in the trenches with me if the shit hit the fan.  That she was the kind of girl who would have your back, but also have that kind of ‘Mash Squad’ humour that can almost make the trenches bearable.  And she was such a talent! That should have been my very first sentence.  She had a gift from the Gods and the courage to express it.  And I think she did give Marvin the love he needed, in the only place he’d felt safe enough to accept it, and not self-defeatedly sabotage it – on the stage and also in their music.”

Let’s TCB some more…if you’ve loads of cash to spare and you’re a Mr Robinson fan you might want to visit his store at http://smokeyrobinson.storenvy/com/ because alongside signed pictures, he’s selling a custom made black suit for a cool $1,200 which was designed for him for the Disney television programme “The Magic Man”.  I’ll give you the details as taken from his website – the black suit features a vest, suspenders (what!) and cape. There are silver rhinestones on the collar and cuffs, vest and down the side of the trouser legs.  The item will be signed and accompanied with a Smokey Robinson Collectables Certificate of Authenticity.  Now, this item may have been on offer for some time, but it’s the first time I’ve noticed it, and honestly wonder why such an iconic artist is selling such a personal article unless – and I’ve just thought of this – he’s raising money for one of his charities.

You may remember that Smokey is the executive music producer for a Netflix animated series for children based on the Jobete catalogue of songs.  Apparently each episode in the series draws inspiration from the music of  Lionel Richie, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Jackson 5 and, of course, Smokey, among others.  And it is this musical backdrop that revolves around the adventures of a shy eight-year-old Ben, who is gifted with an artistic ability to bring street art to life.  Living in the imaginary city of Motown, Ben and his friends discover that creativity is magic, bringing vibrancy to their city.   “I’m thrilled to be a part of this wonderful new series that will embrace the magic of Motown and present our songs to a whole new generation of fans and their families.” Smokey said at the time of the press launch. “I’m so impressed with the creative vision for the series and can’t wait to play my part in bringing it to the world.”   Sounds a hugely interesting project, but unfortunately I’ve been unable to discover more current information about it.   Moving on…

Former Supreme, Scherrie Payne is one of the artists involved in a new music project titled ”La La Peace Song” , the brainchild of producer Rick Gianatos. He explained his reasoning behind the song to Pump It Up Magazine. “I was watching riots take place in Ferguson (after police officer Darren Wilson shot dead Michael Brown in 2014). It reminded me of the riots in my home down, Wilmington, Delaware, after Martin Luther King was killed. I felt a strong sense of déjà vu.”  Written by Johnny Bristol and recorded earlier by both Al Wilson and O.C. Smith,  “La La Peace Song” came to mind as a vehicle to raise funds for all victims of violence. Rick and Johnny had met previously in Detroit during Ian Levine’s Motorcity Reunion sessions. “I co-produced several tracks with Johnny.   He was a wonderful talent and a gentleman of a human being.”  (Yes, I agree – he was an ace guy; ultra friendly, easy going, and a delight to be with)

Anyway, “La La Peace Song” is centred around a trio of lead voices, Pam Vincent, Jim Gilstrap and Joyce Vincent, with additional voices that included  Jessica Williams and Scherrie.  Instead of copying the original version which was styled around Johnny’s “Hang On In There Baby”, Rick injected a seventies flavour akin to Faith, Hope And Charity.  With this release he’s hoping to accomplish an awareness to violent crimes, while addiitionally protesting against the current political climate, which, he said, “seems to condone racism, prejudice, separatism and hatred…Music can teach and it also can heal.  I hope ‘La La Peace Song’ can do both.”  There’s two/three different versions of the song – which is so deliciously catchy that it’s almost impossible to get the hookline out of your mind, while the persuasive vocals push home the important message of love  – so suggest you visit the various sites to hear more.  Thanks guys!

Diana Ross now.  Many fans across Europe have flown to Las Vegas to catch her very special and intimate showcase at The Wynn Encore Theatre.  Firstly, Keith Russell reported back to me last year that Diana was on top form, that her voice was faultless, and the incredible evening was one to be remembered.  He saw her three times, if my memory serves me correctly, but Las Vegas itself wasn’t for him.  I’ve also kept track of other fans making the trip, and was recently contacted by Jim Hegerty who saw her perform this month.  After the thoroughly entertaining show, presented in the lady’s impeccable style, Jim presented Diana with an award from her European fans.

Unclear what this was about and how many fans were involved in organising this award, I caught up with him last week, and he told me the award was his idea because he felt the star had received all the major industry accolades and trophies but, to his knowledge, she’d never actually received one from her fans.  “I designed it and paid for it because I’m hoping that as it’s from her European fans it may prompt her to tour here again” he told me. “Diana is testament to longevity.  Her voice is incredible and her stage presence is awesome.”  Incidentally, Fredy Rimando filmed the short question/answer session after the show – although answering questions appears to be something Diana doesn’t do easily, particularly when asked about her RCA days – so used the ‘get out of jail card’ by singing “Reach Out And Touch (Somebody’s Hand)” instead. Anyway, you can check out Fredy’s short film on  It’s doubtful at this time that Diana will tour outside America though, unlike her former label mates, Lionel Richie, and the Four Tops and The Temptations.

In June, Mr Richie will be performing at venues he’s never been to before, like the County Cricket Ground in Hove, East Sussex, on 23rd, which is about an hour from where I live. Couldn’t believe my eyes!!  Also included is a pair of headlining dates at London’s Hampton Court Palace Festival on 5th and 6th.  The tour starts on 1st at Northampton’s Franklin Gardens, then moves on to Perth, Lincolnshire, Shrewsbury, Leigh, Carlisle, Scarborough, Chesterfield, ending on 24th at Holkham Hall, near Wells-next-the-Sea.  Tickets were haemorrhaging out the door on the first day of sale, so should imagine the tour is now more or less sold out.  Speaking about his return Lionel said. “I’ve been missing the UK and can’t wait to make my long-hgxaawaited return and to see parts of the country I’ve never made it out to before. The fans are always incredible and they make the atmosphere at every show electric, so I look forward to singing along with them soon.”

As for the Four Tops and The Temptations (and having visited several sites for confirmation) I think the dates are as follows for their arena tour in November.  Kicking off in Glasgow’s SEC Armadillo on the 18th, the two groups move through Leeds, Manchester, Gateshead, Birmingham and Liverpool.  Then switch to a somewhat smaller venue at Southend-On-Sea, before hitting London’s 02, with  closing performances at Bournemouth and Nottingham. Again, for this and Lionel’s tour do please check out the relevant sites, particularly as new dates could be included in the future.

Before leaving this subject, and without being controversial, over the years I’ve been contacted by older fans of both groups saying they would prefer to remember them as they were and not as they are now with Duke Fakir and Otis Williams being the only remaining member in the Tops and Tempts respectively.  I fully appreciate their comments and must add that when I first saw these two current groups, I didn’t connect with them either.  So, like many of those who were with the guys from the outset, I likewise, sadly, said my farewells to them and haven’t been back, preferring to remember the two groups in their original format. God bless them.

Finally,  it has been announced that Ace Records are to release the CD package “Baby I’ve Got It – More Motown Girls”  next month.  Of the twenty-four tracks, it seems sixteen are previously unissued, and the remainder being first available on “Motown Unreleased” downloads between 2014 and 2017.  All tracks on this pending release were recorded between 1961 and 1969, and include Brenda Holloway’s “Baby I’ve Got It” (of course!), Kim Weston’s “So Long”,  Little Lisa’s “Keep Away”, Martha and the Vandellas’ “Mr Misery (Let Me Be)” and Barbara McNair’s “You’ve Got Possibilities”, among others. By the way, it took a year to get clearance for these songs and quite possibly this will be the last in the series.  But who knows…..

Thank you for being with me this month, and I promise  there’s plenty more to come, so do stay on board.

February 2018: Reissue Reviews

February 2018: Reissue Reviews

THE MAIN INGREDIENT: BROTHERLY LOVE:THE RCA ANTHOLOGY (SOULMUSIC RECORDS)
Here’s the next anthology in this much respected series from SoulMusic Records and instantly I zoned into a pair of major titles which elevated the group onto the international platform. The first, of course, is the beautifully crafted “Everybody Plays The Fool”, nominated for a Grammy award in the Best R&B category, shifting sales exceeding gold status, and their biggest selling single. With sweet, cool vocals, the song is high in melody and chorus: just beautiful. And the second, “Just Don’t Want To Be Lonely”, in much the same stylish vein. Originally recorded by Ronnie Dyson, this single marked their only UK chart entry, peaking in the top thirty. Previously recording under the name The Poets – a trio comprising Tony Silvester, Donald McPherson and Luther Simmons – for Leiber and Stoller’s Red Bird label, and later as The Insiders for RCA Records, the group underwent a further name change to The Main Ingredient, having seen the phrase on the side of a Coco Cola bottle. The opening track here, “You’ve Been My Inspiration” was the first to hit the US R&B top thirty, and a year later “I’m So Proud” (the group’s take on The Impressions’ song) and “Spinning Around (I Must Be Falling In Love)” hit the top ten.

During 1971, Donald McPherson died from leukemia, to be replaced by Cuba Gooding Snr who, incidentally, already performed with the group when Donald was too ill to appear. With Cuba in the membership, the guys enjoyed their first serious hit with “Everybody Plays The Fool”. When, in 1973, the group felt they were ignoring their R&B audience, their fifth album “Afrodisiac” was deliberately aimed at the funk/soul music market. To further push home their intention, they recorded a trio of Stevie Wonder compositions, “Superwoman”, “Where Were You When I Needed You” and “Something About Love”, and with Syreeta Wright, “I Am Yours”, “Girl Blue” and “Something Lovely”. This current release from a group that was probably overlooked in the grand scheme of musical things, is a welcome reminder of just how talented they were.
Rating: 8

OHIO PLAYERS: DEFINITIVE COLLECTION (ROBINSONGS)
According to the accompanying blurb, this is the very first time fans can purchase such a comprehensive collection of songs from the Ohio Players, taking in as it does, releases spanning their first company, Capitol, through to Arista and Boardwalk. In other words, an entire overview of this funk band who, for a time, secured a successful niche in this particular market, which later haemorrhaged groups playing this musical genre. Anyway, this is a three CD package, where the first, “Early Years” visits their Capitol stay, before moving to Westbound and the group’s first R&B charttopper “Funky Worm” was released. With its blending of early hip hop and synthesiser solos, it was hard to ignore. “Pleasure”, “Pain” and “Ecstasy” likewise carry this company’s logo. The last two titles were lifted from their debut Mercury album “Skin Tight”, namely, the album’s title and “Jive Turkey”, which indicated their future musical path.

Onto the second CD, “The Golden Years” where the highlight “Fire” was considered to be the group’s signature song, with the catchy “Love Rollercoaster” following. The former track, liked by Stevie Wonder, includes an authentic fire engine siren and a guitar solo that’s been ‘borrowed’ numerous times over the years, while the latter, uses the fairground attraction to describe the yo-yo effect of relationships, with the sliding guitar funk riff neatly sewing up the song. A wah wah guitar (bring on Shaft!) leads into the jumpy “Body Vibes”, until tight vocals take over, then the beat changes level, making the voices looser. Hah, caught out with “Happy Holidays”, a seasonal ditty, complete with spoken words to enhance the Christmas message. OK: why not. “Who’d She Coo?”, naturally, is the highlight, representing as it does, the Ohio Player’s only UK hit at number 43 in July 1976.

Finally, the third CD, “The Later & Solo Years” covers the group’s Arista and Broadwalk Records period. Stand out tracks here include “Everybody Up” in its full length version, together with Junie Morrison solo outings, like “Love Has Taken Me Over (Be My Baby)”, and Sugerfoot’s 1985 take on “Fire”. The Ohio Players weren’t a group I’d taken much notice of at the time, and while I enjoyed a fair percentage of this trio of CDs, cannot say I was overwhelmed.
Rating: 6

THE BAR-KAYS: AS ONE/NIGHTCRUISING/PROPOSITONS & DANGEROUS
(ROBINSONGS)
I didn’t know how I was going to cope with this – four CDs crammed with heavy funk. How wrong I was. Sure there’s a lot of the weighty hitting sounds, but, hey, there’s also some compelling ballads to break the beat – like a welcome oasis in a blistering hot desert. A little background first though. Formed during 1966, the Bar-Kays were a studio session group, supporting Stax acts, until Otis Redding grabbed them as his own. As an independent musical unit, their first single “Soul Finger” in 1967 was a crossover US hit. The success was shortlived when, tragically, Otis and two thirds of the group died in December 1967 when their plane crashed into Lake Monona, near Madison, Wisconsin. In time, the band reformed to play on sessions with several Stax artists including Isaac Hayes’ “Hot Buttered Soul” album, and when the Stax/Volt label folded during 1975, the Bar-Kays joined Mercury Records to forge a different, and this time more successful, career playing their own brand of funk music. Now, this heavyweight package of four CDs span 1980 and 1984 while under Mercury’s umbrella.

Starting with “As One”, a top ten US R&B title, it holds the pattern used in all four albums here with a mixture of dance and smooch; the latter being typified by “Take The Time To Love Somebody” which is both powerful and gentle. For dancing, the opening track “Boogie Body Land” fits the bill, with its mellow funk positive beat. I can’t move on without mentioning the final cut “Deliver Us” with its climaxing lush chorus of voices. Quite exceptional, and surprisingly exciting. A year following the release of “As One”, “Nightcruising” hit the shops in 1981 to earn the accolade as their best album yet. Not only did it also peak in the R&B top ten but passed gold status, thanks in part to their changing musical approach into a more current funk styling with the prolific use of synthesisers, so loved by artists like Stevie Wonder. Here the outstanding track for me was the unexpected “Feels Like I’m Falling In Love”, a gentle mover, so engaging with a full vocalled styling. Does it for me every time!

The third (and first on the second CD) “Propositions” from 1982, featured three hits, namely, the stomping funker “Do It (Let Me See You Shake)”, “She Talks To Me With Her Body” with its techno-funk feeling, and the gloriously touching, late night grooved ballad, “Anticipation”. However, one track irritated me beyond words – “(Busted)”, far too busy and cluttered – so moved on to the last CD in this package, “Dangerous” released in 1984, and my least liked. Having said that, “Freakshow On The Dance Floor” with its fast driving beat interrupted by splashes of sweet funk, rightly deserved its top two placing in the R&B chart, and top eighty crossover hit. Or, it could be that being featured in the 1984 movie “Breakdance:The Movie” (“Breakin’” – its American title) gave it a massive heave up. Calming down the pace, a pair of credible cuts ease and weave through the music, “Lovers Should Never Fall In Love” and “Make Believe Lover”. This is a fabulously priced package from a group that rose from the ashes of tragedy to keep their music alive.
Rating: 7

Terry Dexter 2018 SoulMusic.com Interview

Terry Dexter 2018 SoulMusic.com Interview

In 2017, Singer/songwriter, actress and multi-instrumentalist Terry Dexter recorded “I Remember,” a powerhouse duet with ‘America’s Got Talent’ finalist Johnny Manuel, written and produced by award-winning music man Preston Glass. The digital single – released through SoulMusic Records’ association with Preston’s Platinum Garage Recordings – has done well on the UK soul radio charts. In this interview with David Nathan, Terry (whose name has appeared on recordings by a wide range of artists including Patti Labelle, Jaheim, Eric Benet, Wynona Judd, Micheal McDonald, Eminem, Paul Taylor, Will.i.am and George Duke among others) shares about her most recent activities and what it takes to sustain a career as an independent recording artist….

 

Click here to read more about “I Remember,” hear the track and download at CDBaby

Click here to download on Apple Music

 

Motown Spotlight - January 2018

Motown Spotlight – January 2018

As I mentioned “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” in the last couple of months, it got me thinking about Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell again. So I dug out my vinyl copy of the emotionally charged “You’re All I Need” to play in the background as I put those thoughts into notes, and which led me to this….

With Marvin’s duet success with Mary Wells and Kim Weston still ringing in his ears, Berry Gordy needed to find another singing partner for him. A move Marvin would later claim to be “another money making scheme on BG’s part.” Nonetheless, when new Motown signing Tammi Terrell was introduced to Marvin, he liked her on sight. “It was a pleasure for me” Marvin said at the time. “I wanted to work with (her)…she was pretty, nice. She was soft, warm and sweet, yet misunderstood. Yes, I enjoyed working with her.“ From that first meeting, he realised Tammi was a worldly woman who had lived life in the fast lane, yet once they started singing together, she changed “into a warm, special and hopeful woman.” This musical combination resulted in top selling singles that delighted lovers the world over. It seems so ironic that while they epitomised the perfect couple, each had suffered from abusive partners, either physically or mentally. Marvin’s marriage to Anna Gordy had soured, and Tammi had escaped from a series of unsuitable relationships. Yet from the ashes that were left, the perfect musical partnership rose, inspired by another duo, writers Valerie Simpson and Nickolas Ashford, who wrote of the real love Marvin felt was missing in his failed marriage. The fact that the lyrics they sang were an extension of the writers’ love for each other, or an imaginative play on words, didn’t cross the singer’s mind.

Tammi’s sister, Ludie Montgomery believed that teaming up with Marvin was a liberating move for her. Tammi, she said, felt creative and free, enabling her to forge an emotional connection with Marvin, Valerie and Nickolas. Her relationship with producers Harvey Fuqua and Johnny Bristol was by now solid anyway, so the future promised fulfilment and success for the young, shy singer and the angry, hurt sex idol. With everything in place, the musical adventure began in January 1967 when Tammi recorded her vocals for the song (Marvin recorded his a month later) that was earmarked to launch them into the extremely lucrative duet market. Aptly titled “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough”, it was the perfect signature tune for their future career together. Berry Gordy noted in his autobiography “To Be Loved” that Harvey Fuqua and Johnny Bristol’s production – “added a new sophisticated and dramatic element to the overall sound. When their first production on Marvin and Tammi was brought into the Friday meeting, there was no debate.” In June 1967 the single shot into the US mainstream top twenty, and top three in the R&B listing. Shamefully, the UK didn’t share their American colleagues’ enthusiasm. Not only did it burn up the US charts, but the song was also nominated for a Grammy award, and, of course, went on to be re-recorded several times, including the magnificent, re-working by Diana Ross which ingenuously mixed ballad, drama and dance.

As noted previously, “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” wasn’t born as a song for two, but working with Marvin and Tammi, its composers realised it could easily be adapted. As with several of their duets, Tammi laid down her vocals first, although in this instance, it was done because she hadn’t learned the lyrics. However, when Marvin heard the pre-recorded track, he said he could feel her presence which, in turn, made him more alive, and as Johnny Bristol told Ludie Montgomery for her book “My Sister Tommie”, it cemented the singers’ respect and love for each other – “Friendship transcended the presence and they both didn’t have to be there to capture the feeling.” Johnny also felt the song established a spiritual connection for everyone associated with the song. and that when Marvin later joined them in the studio, “He had a fun time and everyone felt the same about the sessions. It was a great environment working with Tammi and Marvin. They did what they did naturally.” All worked comfortably together, tagging themselves the ‘riff brothers’, with Tammi the ‘riff sister’. “They had a magical …. connection, and when they sang they sounded like they (had known) each other their entire lives.”

Marvin told author David Ritz in his book “Divided Soul” that Tammi was a woman who could not be controlled by men. “I loved that about (her). I knew we could be friends, but not lovers. Independent women hold no romantic interest for me.” He conceded though that when they were singing together, they were in love, but this was the result of him creating two characters – “two lovers that might have been taken from a play or a novel…. that’s how the Marvin-and-Tammi characters were born.”

With the runaway success of “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” came distress. Six months after its release, in October 1967, Tammi collapsed on stage during a performance before four thousand students, at Virginia’s Hampton-Sydney College. Part way through their third song, as she fell, Marvin grabbed her by the arms, and carried her off stage. Having suffered from dizziness and migraine headaches for some time, Tammi had been feeling ill before the 8pm concert, so took time out to recuperate on a couch backstage, while Marvin played poker with his musicians in a nearby room. Rumours ran amok as to the reason for her collapse. Past boyfriends, including David Ruffin, were blamed due to their violent behaviour towards her, and indeed, it is in the public domain that she was hit about the head with a hammer and, on another occasion, pushed down a flight of stairs. However, at the time, the guessing game was in first gear. Motown eventually released a press statement confirming that a slow growing malignant tumour on the right side of Tammi’s brain had been diagnosed. When Marvin realised just how sick his singing partner was, he was inconsolable, a feeling that, by the way, never left him. Thankfully, Tammi slowly recovered from surgery to continue recording, where the first sessions included “You’re All I Need To Get By”.

Meanwhile, the British market also failed to support the duo’s second release “Your Precious Love”, reminiscent of the floating Moonglows’ style, and again lifted from their debut “United” album. It sold better than its predecessor by soaring into the US top five, and narrowly missing the R&B top spot, during the September. A Valerie Simpson favourite, because it was one of the first written with the duettists in mind, and, “there was something very sexy about the way they did it.” Featuring Harvey Fuqua, Marvin and Tammi on backing vocals, Valerie acknowledged to Ludie Montgomery, Tammi’s additional input, including the ad-libs – “that’s why it was so great to have them both in the studio together because they would bounce off each other. “ During the life of “Your Precious Love”, Tammi was pictured on crutches, sneaking into The Cherry Hill Theatre/Restaurant in Camden, New Jersey, to watch Marvin perform. It was an emotional scene to witness.

With no UK action so far, sighs of relief must have been heard in Motown’s London office, when the third outing “If I Could Build My Whole World Around You”, recorded in the Hitsville studio between 16 and 21 March 1967, crept into the British top fifty during January 1968, launching their musical love affair. Once again the single hovered below the US R&B top spot but peaked in the top ten.

Marvin and Tammi’s first single of 1968, “Ain’t Nothing Like The Real Thing”, lifted from their second album “You’re All I Need”, faired better than their previous British release by peaking in the top forty, while across the Atlantic, it managed to top the R&B chart and was their second pop top ten hit. Marvin recalled recording that particular song because they were trying different kinds of riffs and note changes to challenge each other, “and that’s how that song is as melodic and syncopated in the way that it is…. We really had fun recording that.” And the album itself re-established their vinyl love affair – they cried, rejoiced, teased, pledging unremitting emotions. It was their first hour, but recorded under the direst of circumstances due to Tammi’s failing health, as noted in the album’s sleeve notes. It seems that when “You’re All I Need” was issued, Tammi, had undergone at least six operations, and was in hospital, later recuperating in the Bahamas. “I’m feeling fine” she said in an interview at the time. Learning to knit while in hospital made her feel like a grandma, she continued, and upon returning home she started cooking and eating soul food. “I went down to ninety-three pounds in the hospital and now I weigh one hundred and twenty-five.” Her hair, shorn for surgery, was almost natural now. “But, for a while there, my father said I looked just like him.” It was also reported that she was partially sighted and had lost some of her motor functions, hence the crutches or wheelchair. However, it’s thought that Tammi’s sheer determination to return to work pulled her through, and her nagging depressive moods at missing performing with Marvin just as their star was rising, began lifting. However, despite all her best intentions, doctors insisted she stick to a limited work schedule, had daily concentrated rest periods, with live performances a no-go area. It was also disclosed that Motown paid her medical bills.

It was a tragedy. Tammi Terrell was, at last, in a position to shrug off her past struggling years, but was now unable to enjoy them. Promotional work was also difficult. With their chart success, it was obvious the public wanted to see them, and tour promoters, television shows and the media in general, flooded to feature them. Some commitments were jointly honoured, but when Tammi was unable to join him, it was a reluctant Marvin who went it alone without being able to divulge the true nature of his partner’s absence. In the end, Motown singer Barbara Randolph replaced Tammi on stage, a move she wasn’t comfortable with, as she told me. “It was very difficult working with him because these were his troubled years. For example, I was booked to appear at the Apollo with him, and it was one of the many occasions he didn’t show up. I ended up appearing there alone which was really frightening. It was scary (because) they throw hard boiled eggs. And the audience was waiting for Marvin.” Nevertheless, Barbara had nothing but admiration for him, saying she never heard him raise his voice in anger, or get into any type of loud situation. “He was extremely likeable, easy going, and a very mellow person…I admired him before I ever worked with him.” Meanwhile, Tammi concentrated on recording and, apparently, was often seen in the studio singing from a wheelchair or balanced between crutches.

“You’re All I Need To Get By”, with Ashford and Simpson on backing vocals, finally crashed the UK top twenty in October 1968, and once again Marvin and Tammi dominated the US R&B listing, this time, for five consecutive weeks, and racked up another top ten mainstream hit.

Into 1969, and with The Andantes and The Originals as session singers, another track from the “You’re All I Need” album, “You Ain’t Livin’ ‘Till Your Lovin’” hit the UK top thirty in the June, while the States opted for “Keep On Lovin’ Me Honey”; top thirty and twenty in the US pop and R&B charts respectively. Marvin’s solo status was about to drastically change when, slotted in between the run of duets, his “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” shot to the top of the UK chart, with repeat performances across the world. The game plan was changing, Marvin was now an international name and, of course, much in demand. The single’s runaway success had taken Marvin and Motown by surprise. Having been recorded early-1967, Marvin’s was the second version to be released (the first by Gladys Knight and the Pips, although the very first take was an album track by The Miracles on their 1968 “Special Occasion”). Marvin’s moody interpretation, a stroke of genius by producer Norman Whitfield, was hidden away on his “In The Groove” album. However, it didn’t stay concealed for long because it grabbed the attention of some American radio DJs who gave it serious airtime, leaving Berry Gordy no option but to release it as a single. Prior to this international chart topper, Marvin had several solo outings to his credit, including “You’re Unchanging Love”, “You” and “Chained”, while in January 1969, Tammi released her only solo album “Irresistible”, from which a series of singles were extracted.

However, both artists were committed to further duets, and were in the process of completing a third album “Easy”, when one of its tracks, the musical jewel “Good Lovin’ Ain’t Easy To Come By” was lifted during June 1969. Hitting the top thirty on both sides of the Atlantic, plus a top twenty placing in the R&B listing, the public was unaware of the turmoil created behind closed studio doors due to an ailing Tammi. Next out in America was another track “What You Gave Me”, while Motown in Britain chose “The Onion Song” for November 1969 release. Despite its cheesy title, the song actually reflected social consciousness although did appear to be a little slice of nonsense upon first hearing. In hindsight, the song was probably more suited to the British market, but following its unexpected top ten success, America released it during March 1970, to falter in the top fifty, and the R&B top forty.

Over the years, much as been said about their last studio album “Easy” with a somewhat shoddy, unattractive painting by Carl Owens on the front sleeve. Fans had no reason to believe that the music inside wasn’t an authentic Marvin and Tammi release. However, when it was leaked from Motown that Tammi was unable to record, doubts were cast. It’s now on public record that Marvin actually did not want to work on this album because his singing partner was too ill, and that the suggestion of a replacement singer would not only deceive the public, but destroy the special, intimate relationship he shared with Tammi. However, he changed his mind when Berry Gordy confirmed that Tammi and her family would benefit from the album’s sales and any extracted singles. After much speculation, it’s now thought that the majority of the album tracks were authentic, and when two or three titles were needed to complete the project, Valerie Simpson stepped in. A move she has both confirmed and denied, by saying she helped Tammi sing her parts. In a later interview, Marvin revealed Tammi didn’t record much on the album at all, and confirmed Valerie had recorded “The Onion Song” and “What You Gave Me”. Saying she had faithfully captured Tammi’s voice, skilfully imitating her distinctive style and only someone who had worked so intimately with her could possibly have pulled this off. And also as Valerie had probably recorded several of their demos, she was the obvious ‘culprit’. In hindsight, this is irrelevant. It isn’t the first time Motown’s marketing department has stretched the truth. Didn’t The Andantes record with Diana Ross, yet records were released showing “Diana Ross and the Supremes” on the labels? We were none the wiser back then. It’s only in recent times with the growing demand for unreleased material that studio paperwork revealed we had been misled. Having said that, with the “Easy” front sleeve being a painting, fans, like myself, did question Tammi’s involvement in the recordings, although eventually accepted, having seen pictures of the ailing singer in the American press, that a new photo shoot for the project was out of the question. This didn’t affect our enjoyment of the album, despite it being a mixture of sounds. But our hearts went out to Miss Terrell.

While the UK was celebrating Motown’s 10th anniversary in 1970 – and after two and a half years of fighting her illness which entailed several hospital stays, where Marvin was a regular visitor – Tammi Terrell slipped into a coma and died from brain cancer complications on 16 March, a month before her twenty-fifth birthday. Fourteen years later, Marvin Gaye was shot dead by his father on 1 April, a day short of his forty-fifth birthday.

Valerie Simpson: “The chemistry between them was fantastic and while they never had a romance in real life, when they sang together ‘wow’, they were lovers.”

As I mentioned “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” in the last couple of months, it got me thinking about Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell again. So I dug out my vinyl copy of the emotionally charged “You’re All I Need” to play in the background as I put those thoughts into notes, and which led me to this….

With Marvin’s duet success with Mary Wells and Kim Weston still ringing in his ears, Berry Gordy needed to find another singing partner for him. A move Marvin would later claim to be “another money making scheme on BG’s part.” Nonetheless, when new Motown signing Tammi Terrell was introduced to Marvin, he liked her on sight. “It was a pleasure for me” Marvin said at the time. “I wanted to work with (her)…she was pretty, nice. She was soft, warm and sweet, yet misunderstood. Yes, I enjoyed working with her.“ From that first meeting, he realised Tammi was a worldly woman who had lived life in the fast lane, yet once they started singing together, she changed “into a warm, special and hopeful woman.” This musical combination resulted in top selling singles that delighted lovers the world over. It seems so ironic that while they epitomised the perfect couple, each had suffered from abusive partners, either physically or mentally. Marvin’s marriage to Anna Gordy had soured, and Tammi had escaped from a series of unsuitable relationships. Yet from the ashes that were left, the perfect musical partnership rose, inspired by another duo, writers Valerie Simpson and Nickolas Ashford, who wrote of the real love Marvin felt was missing in his failed marriage. The fact that the lyrics they sang were an extension of the writers’ love for each other, or an imaginative play on words, didn’t cross the singer’s mind.

Tammi’s sister, Ludie Montgomery believed that teaming up with Marvin was a liberating move for her. Tammi, she said, felt creative and free, enabling her to forge an emotional connection with Marvin, Valerie and Nickolas. Her relationship with producers Harvey Fuqua and Johnny Bristol was by now solid anyway, so the future promised fulfilment and success for the young, shy singer and the angry, hurt sex idol. With everything in place, the musical adventure began in January 1967 when Tammi recorded her vocals for the song (Marvin recorded his a month later) that was earmarked to launch them into the extremely lucrative duet market. Aptly titled “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough”, it was the perfect signature tune for their future career together. Berry Gordy noted in his autobiography “To Be Loved” that Harvey Fuqua and Johnny Bristol’s production – “added a new sophisticated and dramatic element to the overall sound. When their first production on Marvin and Tammi was brought into the Friday meeting, there was no debate.” In June 1967 the single shot into the US mainstream top twenty, and top three in the R&B listing. Shamefully, the UK didn’t share their American colleagues’ enthusiasm. Not only did it burn up the US charts, but the song was also nominated for a Grammy award, and, of course, went on to be re-recorded several times, including the magnificent, re-working by Diana Ross which ingenuously mixed ballad, drama and dance.

As noted previously, “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” wasn’t born as a song for two, but working with Marvin and Tammi, its composers realised it could easily be adapted. As with several of their duets, Tammi laid down her vocals first, although in this instance, it was done because she hadn’t learned the lyrics. However, when Marvin heard the pre-recorded track, he said he could feel her presence which, in turn, made him more alive, and as Johnny Bristol told Ludie Montgomery for her book “My Sister Tommie”, it cemented the singers’ respect and love for each other – “Friendship transcended the presence and they both didn’t have to be there to capture the feeling.” Johnny also felt the song established a spiritual connection for everyone associated with the song. and that when Marvin later joined them in the studio, “He had a fun time and everyone felt the same about the sessions. It was a great environment working with Tammi and Marvin. They did what they did naturally.” All worked comfortably together, tagging themselves the ‘riff brothers’, with Tammi the ‘riff sister’. “They had a magical …. connection, and when they sang they sounded like they (had known) each other their entire lives.”

Marvin told author David Ritz in his book “Divided Soul” that Tammi was a woman who could not be controlled by men. “I loved that about (her). I knew we could be friends, but not lovers. Independent women hold no romantic interest for me.” He conceded though that when they were singing together, they were in love, but this was the result of him creating two characters – “two lovers that might have been taken from a play or a novel…. that’s how the Marvin-and-Tammi characters were born.”

With the runaway success of “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” came distress. Six months after its release, in October 1967, Tammi collapsed on stage during a performance before four thousand students, at Virginia’s Hampton-Sydney College. Part way through their third song, as she fell, Marvin grabbed her by the arms, and carried her off stage. Having suffered from dizziness and migraine headaches for some time, Tammi had been feeling ill before the 8pm concert, so took time out to recuperate on a couch backstage, while Marvin played poker with his musicians in a nearby room. Rumours ran amok as to the reason for her collapse. Past boyfriends, including David Ruffin, were blamed due to their violent behaviour towards her, and indeed, it is in the public domain that she was hit about the head with a hammer and, on another occasion, pushed down a flight of stairs. However, at the time, the guessing game was in first gear. Motown eventually released a press statement confirming that a slow growing malignant tumour on the right side of Tammi’s brain had been diagnosed. When Marvin realised just how sick his singing partner was, he was inconsolable, a feeling that, by the way, never left him. Thankfully, Tammi slowly recovered from surgery to continue recording, where the first sessions included “You’re All I Need To Get By”.

Meanwhile, the British market also failed to support the duo’s second release “Your Precious Love”, reminiscent of the floating Moonglows’ style, and again lifted from their debut “United” album. It sold better than its predecessor by soaring into the US top five, and narrowly missing the R&B top spot, during the September. A Valerie Simpson favourite, because it was one of the first written with the duettists in mind, and, “there was something very sexy about the way they did it.” Featuring Harvey Fuqua, Marvin and Tammi on backing vocals, Valerie acknowledged to Ludie Montgomery, Tammi’s additional input, including the ad-libs – “that’s why it was so great to have them both in the studio together because they would bounce off each other. “ During the life of “Your Precious Love”, Tammi was pictured on crutches, sneaking into The Cherry Hill Theatre/Restaurant in Camden, New Jersey, to watch Marvin perform. It was an emotional scene to witness.

With no UK action so far, sighs of relief must have been heard in Motown’s London office, when the third outing “If I Could Build My Whole World Around You”, recorded in the Hitsville studio between 16 and 21 March 1967, crept into the British top fifty during January 1968, launching their musical love affair. Once again the single hovered below the US R&B top spot but peaked in the top ten.

Marvin and Tammi’s first single of 1968, “Ain’t Nothing Like The Real Thing”, lifted from their second album “You’re All I Need”, faired better than their previous British release by peaking in the top forty, while across the Atlantic, it managed to top the R&B chart and was their second pop top ten hit. Marvin recalled recording that particular song because they were trying different kinds of riffs and note changes to challenge each other, “and that’s how that song is as melodic and syncopated in the way that it is…. We really had fun recording that.” And the album itself re-established their vinyl love affair – they cried, rejoiced, teased, pledging unremitting emotions. It was their first hour, but recorded under the direst of circumstances due to Tammi’s failing health, as noted in the album’s sleeve notes. It seems that when “You’re All I Need” was issued, Tammi, had undergone at least six operations, and was in hospital, later recuperating in the Bahamas. “I’m feeling fine” she said in an interview at the time. Learning to knit while in hospital made her feel like a grandma, she continued, and upon returning home she started cooking and eating soul food. “I went down to ninety-three pounds in the hospital and now I weigh one hundred and twenty-five.” Her hair, shorn for surgery, was almost natural now. “But, for a while there, my father said I looked just like him.” It was also reported that she was partially sighted and had lost some of her motor functions, hence the crutches or wheelchair. However, it’s thought that Tammi’s sheer determination to return to work pulled her through, and her nagging depressive moods at missing performing with Marvin just as their star was rising, began lifting. However, despite all her best intentions, doctors insisted she stick to a limited work schedule, had daily concentrated rest periods, with live performances a no-go area. It was also disclosed that Motown paid her medical bills.

It was a tragedy. Tammi Terrell was, at last, in a position to shrug off her past struggling years, but was now unable to enjoy them. Promotional work was also difficult. With their chart success, it was obvious the public wanted to see them, and tour promoters, television shows and the media in general, flooded to feature them. Some commitments were jointly honoured, but when Tammi was unable to join him, it was a reluctant Marvin who went it alone without being able to divulge the true nature of his partner’s absence. In the end, Motown singer Barbara Randolph replaced Tammi on stage, a move she wasn’t comfortable with, as she told me. “It was very difficult working with him because these were his troubled years. For example, I was booked to appear at the Apollo with him, and it was one of the many occasions he didn’t show up. I ended up appearing there alone which was really frightening. It was scary (because) they throw hard boiled eggs. And the audience was waiting for Marvin.” Nevertheless, Barbara had nothing but admiration for him, saying she never heard him raise his voice in anger, or get into any type of loud situation. “He was extremely likeable, easy going, and a very mellow person…I admired him before I ever worked with him.” Meanwhile, Tammi concentrated on recording and, apparently, was often seen in the studio singing from a wheelchair or balanced between crutches.

“You’re All I Need To Get By”, with Ashford and Simpson on backing vocals, finally crashed the UK top twenty in October 1968, and once again Marvin and Tammi dominated the US R&B listing, this time, for five consecutive weeks, and racked up another top ten mainstream hit.

Into 1969, and with The Andantes and The Originals as session singers, another track from the “You’re All I Need” album, “You Ain’t Livin’ ‘Till Your Lovin’” hit the UK top thirty in the June, while the States opted for “Keep On Lovin’ Me Honey”; top thirty and twenty in the US pop and R&B charts respectively. Marvin’s solo status was about to drastically change when, slotted in between the run of duets, his “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” shot to the top of the UK chart, with repeat performances across the world. The game plan was changing, Marvin was now an international name and, of course, much in demand. The single’s runaway success had taken Marvin and Motown by surprise. Having been recorded early-1967, Marvin’s was the second version to be released (the first by Gladys Knight and the Pips, although the very first take was an album track by The Miracles on their 1968 “Special Occasion”). Marvin’s moody interpretation, a stroke of genius by producer Norman Whitfield, was hidden away on his “In The Groove” album. However, it didn’t stay concealed for long because it grabbed the attention of some American radio DJs who gave it serious airtime, leaving Berry Gordy no option but to release it as a single. Prior to this international chart topper, Marvin had several solo outings to his credit, including “You’re Unchanging Love”, “You” and “Chained”, while in January 1969, Tammi released her only solo album “Irresistible”, from which a series of singles were extracted.

However, both artists were committed to further duets, and were in the process of completing a third album “Easy”, when one of its tracks, the musical jewel “Good Lovin’ Ain’t Easy To Come By” was lifted during June 1969. Hitting the top thirty on both sides of the Atlantic, plus a top twenty placing in the R&B listing, the public was unaware of the turmoil created behind closed studio doors due to an ailing Tammi. Next out in America was another track “What You Gave Me”, while Motown in Britain chose “The Onion Song” for November 1969 release. Despite its cheesy title, the song actually reflected social consciousness although did appear to be a little slice of nonsense upon first hearing. In hindsight, the song was probably more suited to the British market, but following its unexpected top ten success, America released it during March 1970, to falter in the top fifty, and the R&B top forty.

Over the years, much as been said about their last studio album “Easy” with a somewhat shoddy, unattractive painting by Carl Owens on the front sleeve. Fans had no reason to believe that the music inside wasn’t an authentic Marvin and Tammi release. However, when it was leaked from Motown that Tammi was unable to record, doubts were cast. It’s now on public record that Marvin actually did not want to work on this album because his singing partner was too ill, and that the suggestion of a replacement singer would not only deceive the public, but destroy the special, intimate relationship he shared with Tammi. However, he changed his mind when Berry Gordy confirmed that Tammi and her family would benefit from the album’s sales and any extracted singles. After much speculation, it’s now thought that the majority of the album tracks were authentic, and when two or three titles were needed to complete the project, Valerie Simpson stepped in. A move she has both confirmed and denied, by saying she helped Tammi sing her parts. In a later interview, Marvin revealed Tammi didn’t record much on the album at all, and confirmed Valerie had recorded “The Onion Song” and “What You Gave Me”. Saying she had faithfully captured Tammi’s voice, skilfully imitating her distinctive style and only someone who had worked so intimately with her could possibly have pulled this off. And also as Valerie had probably recorded several of their demos, she was the obvious ‘culprit’. In hindsight, this is irrelevant. It isn’t the first time Motown’s marketing department has stretched the truth. Didn’t The Andantes record with Diana Ross, yet records were released showing “Diana Ross and the Supremes” on the labels? We were none the wiser back then. It’s only in recent times with the growing demand for unreleased material that studio paperwork revealed we had been misled. Having said that, with the “Easy” front sleeve being a painting, fans, like myself, did question Tammi’s involvement in the recordings, although eventually accepted, having seen pictures of the ailing singer in the American press, that a new photo shoot for the project was out of the question. This didn’t affect our enjoyment of the album, despite it being a mixture of sounds. But our hearts went out to Miss Terrell.

While the UK was celebrating Motown’s 10th anniversary in 1970 – and after two and a half years of fighting her illness which entailed several hospital stays, where Marvin was a regular visitor – Tammi Terrell slipped into a coma and died from brain cancer complications on 16 March, a month before her twenty-fifth birthday. Fourteen years later, Marvin Gaye was shot dead by his father on 1 April, a day short of his forty-fifth birthday.

Valerie Simpson: “The chemistry between them was fantastic and while they never had a romance in real life, when they sang together ‘wow’, they were lovers.”

As I mentioned “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” in the last couple of months, it got me thinking about Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell again. So I dug out my vinyl copy of the emotionally charged “You’re All I Need” to play in the background as I put those thoughts into notes, and which led me to this….

With Marvin’s duet success with Mary Wells and Kim Weston still ringing in his ears, Berry Gordy needed to find another singing partner for him. A move Marvin would later claim to be “another money making scheme on BG’s part.” Nonetheless, when new Motown signing Tammi Terrell was introduced to Marvin, he liked her on sight. “It was a pleasure for me” Marvin said at the time. “I wanted to work with (her)…she was pretty, nice. She was soft, warm and sweet, yet misunderstood. Yes, I enjoyed working with her.“ From that first meeting, he realised Tammi was a worldly woman who had lived life in the fast lane, yet once they started singing together, she changed “into a warm, special and hopeful woman.” This musical combination resulted in top selling singles that delighted lovers the world over. It seems so ironic that while they epitomised the perfect couple, each had suffered from abusive partners, either physically or mentally. Marvin’s marriage to Anna Gordy had soured, and Tammi had escaped from a series of unsuitable relationships. Yet from the ashes that were left, the perfect musical partnership rose, inspired by another duo, writers Valerie Simpson and Nickolas Ashford, who wrote of the real love Marvin felt was missing in his failed marriage. The fact that the lyrics they sang were an extension of the writers’ love for each other, or an imaginative play on words, didn’t cross the singer’s mind.

Tammi’s sister, Ludie Montgomery believed that teaming up with Marvin was a liberating move for her. Tammi, she said, felt creative and free, enabling her to forge an emotional connection with Marvin, Valerie and Nickolas. Her relationship with producers Harvey Fuqua and Johnny Bristol was by now solid anyway, so the future promised fulfilment and success for the young, shy singer and the angry, hurt sex idol. With everything in place, the musical adventure began in January 1967 when Tammi recorded her vocals for the song (Marvin recorded his a month later) that was earmarked to launch them into the extremely lucrative duet market. Aptly titled “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough”, it was the perfect signature tune for their future career together. Berry Gordy noted in his autobiography “To Be Loved” that Harvey Fuqua and Johnny Bristol’s production – “added a new sophisticated and dramatic element to the overall sound. When their first production on Marvin and Tammi was brought into the Friday meeting, there was no debate.” In June 1967 the single shot into the US mainstream top twenty, and top three in the R&B listing. Shamefully, the UK didn’t share their American colleagues’ enthusiasm. Not only did it burn up the US charts, but the song was also nominated for a Grammy award, and, of course, went on to be re-recorded several times, including the magnificent, re-working by Diana Ross which ingenuously mixed ballad, drama and dance.

As noted previously, “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” wasn’t born as a song for two, but working with Marvin and Tammi, its composers realised it could easily be adapted. As with several of their duets, Tammi laid down her vocals first, although in this instance, it was done because she hadn’t learned the lyrics. However, when Marvin heard the pre-recorded track, he said he could feel her presence which, in turn, made him more alive, and as Johnny Bristol told Ludie Montgomery for her book “My Sister Tommie”, it cemented the singers’ respect and love for each other – “Friendship transcended the presence and they both didn’t have to be there to capture the feeling.” Johnny also felt the song established a spiritual connection for everyone associated with the song. and that when Marvin later joined them in the studio, “He had a fun time and everyone felt the same about the sessions. It was a great environment working with Tammi and Marvin. They did what they did naturally.” All worked comfortably together, tagging themselves the ‘riff brothers’, with Tammi the ‘riff sister’. “They had a magical …. connection, and when they sang they sounded like they (had known) each other their entire lives.”

Marvin told author David Ritz in his book “Divided Soul” that Tammi was a woman who could not be controlled by men. “I loved that about (her). I knew we could be friends, but not lovers. Independent women hold no romantic interest for me.” He conceded though that when they were singing together, they were in love, but this was the result of him creating two characters – “two lovers that might have been taken from a play or a novel…. that’s how the Marvin-and-Tammi characters were born.”

With the runaway success of “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” came distress. Six months after its release, in October 1967, Tammi collapsed on stage during a performance before four thousand students, at Virginia’s Hampton-Sydney College. Part way through their third song, as she fell, Marvin grabbed her by the arms, and carried her off stage. Having suffered from dizziness and migraine headaches for some time, Tammi had been feeling ill before the 8pm concert, so took time out to recuperate on a couch backstage, while Marvin played poker with his musicians in a nearby room. Rumours ran amok as to the reason for her collapse. Past boyfriends, including David Ruffin, were blamed due to their violent behaviour towards her, and indeed, it is in the public domain that she was hit about the head with a hammer and, on another occasion, pushed down a flight of stairs. However, at the time, the guessing game was in first gear. Motown eventually released a press statement confirming that a slow growing malignant tumour on the right side of Tammi’s brain had been diagnosed. When Marvin realised just how sick his singing partner was, he was inconsolable, a feeling that, by the way, never left him. Thankfully, Tammi slowly recovered from surgery to continue recording, where the first sessions included “You’re All I Need To Get By”.

Meanwhile, the British market also failed to support the duo’s second release “Your Precious Love”, reminiscent of the floating Moonglows’ style, and again lifted from their debut “United” album. It sold better than its predecessor by soaring into the US top five, and narrowly missing the R&B top spot, during the September. A Valerie Simpson favourite, because it was one of the first written with the duettists in mind, and, “there was something very sexy about the way they did it.” Featuring Harvey Fuqua, Marvin and Tammi on backing vocals, Valerie acknowledged to Ludie Montgomery, Tammi’s additional input, including the ad-libs – “that’s why it was so great to have them both in the studio together because they would bounce off each other. “ During the life of “Your Precious Love”, Tammi was pictured on crutches, sneaking into The Cherry Hill Theatre/Restaurant in Camden, New Jersey, to watch Marvin perform. It was an emotional scene to witness.

With no UK action so far, sighs of relief must have been heard in Motown’s London office, when the third outing “If I Could Build My Whole World Around You”, recorded in the Hitsville studio between 16 and 21 March 1967, crept into the British top fifty during January 1968, launching their musical love affair. Once again the single hovered below the US R&B top spot but peaked in the top ten.

Marvin and Tammi’s first single of 1968, “Ain’t Nothing Like The Real Thing”, lifted from their second album “You’re All I Need”, faired better than their previous British release by peaking in the top forty, while across the Atlantic, it managed to top the R&B chart and was their second pop top ten hit. Marvin recalled recording that particular song because they were trying different kinds of riffs and note changes to challenge each other, “and that’s how that song is as melodic and syncopated in the way that it is…. We really had fun recording that.” And the album itself re-established their vinyl love affair – they cried, rejoiced, teased, pledging unremitting emotions. It was their first hour, but recorded under the direst of circumstances due to Tammi’s failing health, as noted in the album’s sleeve notes. It seems that when “You’re All I Need” was issued, Tammi, had undergone at least six operations, and was in hospital, later recuperating in the Bahamas. “I’m feeling fine” she said in an interview at the time. Learning to knit while in hospital made her feel like a grandma, she continued, and upon returning home she started cooking and eating soul food. “I went down to ninety-three pounds in the hospital and now I weigh one hundred and twenty-five.” Her hair, shorn for surgery, was almost natural now. “But, for a while there, my father said I looked just like him.” It was also reported that she was partially sighted and had lost some of her motor functions, hence the crutches or wheelchair. However, it’s thought that Tammi’s sheer determination to return to work pulled her through, and her nagging depressive moods at missing performing with Marvin just as their star was rising, began lifting. However, despite all her best intentions, doctors insisted she stick to a limited work schedule, had daily concentrated rest periods, with live performances a no-go area. It was also disclosed that Motown paid her medical bills.

It was a tragedy. Tammi Terrell was, at last, in a position to shrug off her past struggling years, but was now unable to enjoy them. Promotional work was also difficult. With their chart success, it was obvious the public wanted to see them, and tour promoters, television shows and the media in general, flooded to feature them. Some commitments were jointly honoured, but when Tammi was unable to join him, it was a reluctant Marvin who went it alone without being able to divulge the true nature of his partner’s absence. In the end, Motown singer Barbara Randolph replaced Tammi on stage, a move she wasn’t comfortable with, as she told me. “It was very difficult working with him because these were his troubled years. For example, I was booked to appear at the Apollo with him, and it was one of the many occasions he didn’t show up. I ended up appearing there alone which was really frightening. It was scary (because) they throw hard boiled eggs. And the audience was waiting for Marvin.” Nevertheless, Barbara had nothing but admiration for him, saying she never heard him raise his voice in anger, or get into any type of loud situation. “He was extremely likeable, easy going, and a very mellow person…I admired him before I ever worked with him.” Meanwhile, Tammi concentrated on recording and, apparently, was often seen in the studio singing from a wheelchair or balanced between crutches.

“You’re All I Need To Get By”, with Ashford and Simpson on backing vocals, finally crashed the UK top twenty in October 1968, and once again Marvin and Tammi dominated the US R&B listing, this time, for five consecutive weeks, and racked up another top ten mainstream hit.

Into 1969, and with The Andantes and The Originals as session singers, another track from the “You’re All I Need” album, “You Ain’t Livin’ ‘Till Your Lovin’” hit the UK top thirty in the June, while the States opted for “Keep On Lovin’ Me Honey”; top thirty and twenty in the US pop and R&B charts respectively. Marvin’s solo status was about to drastically change when, slotted in between the run of duets, his “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” shot to the top of the UK chart, with repeat performances across the world. The game plan was changing, Marvin was now an international name and, of course, much in demand. The single’s runaway success had taken Marvin and Motown by surprise. Having been recorded early-1967, Marvin’s was the second version to be released (the first by Gladys Knight and the Pips, although the very first take was an album track by The Miracles on their 1968 “Special Occasion”). Marvin’s moody interpretation, a stroke of genius by producer Norman Whitfield, was hidden away on his “In The Groove” album. However, it didn’t stay concealed for long because it grabbed the attention of some American radio DJs who gave it serious airtime, leaving Berry Gordy no option but to release it as a single. Prior to this international chart topper, Marvin had several solo outings to his credit, including “You’re Unchanging Love”, “You” and “Chained”, while in January 1969, Tammi released her only solo album “Irresistible”, from which a series of singles were extracted.

However, both artists were committed to further duets, and were in the process of completing a third album “Easy”, when one of its tracks, the musical jewel “Good Lovin’ Ain’t Easy To Come By” was lifted during June 1969. Hitting the top thirty on both sides of the Atlantic, plus a top twenty placing in the R&B listing, the public was unaware of the turmoil created behind closed studio doors due to an ailing Tammi. Next out in America was another track “What You Gave Me”, while Motown in Britain chose “The Onion Song” for November 1969 release. Despite its cheesy title, the song actually reflected social consciousness although did appear to be a little slice of nonsense upon first hearing. In hindsight, the song was probably more suited to the British market, but following its unexpected top ten success, America released it during March 1970, to falter in the top fifty, and the R&B top forty.

Over the years, much as been said about their last studio album “Easy” with a somewhat shoddy, unattractive painting by Carl Owens on the front sleeve. Fans had no reason to believe that the music inside wasn’t an authentic Marvin and Tammi release. However, when it was leaked from Motown that Tammi was unable to record, doubts were cast. It’s now on public record that Marvin actually did not want to work on this album because his singing partner was too ill, and that the suggestion of a replacement singer would not only deceive the public, but destroy the special, intimate relationship he shared with Tammi. However, he changed his mind when Berry Gordy confirmed that Tammi and her family would benefit from the album’s sales and any extracted singles. After much speculation, it’s now thought that the majority of the album tracks were authentic, and when two or three titles were needed to complete the project, Valerie Simpson stepped in. A move she has both confirmed and denied, by saying she helped Tammi sing her parts. In a later interview, Marvin revealed Tammi didn’t record much on the album at all, and confirmed Valerie had recorded “The Onion Song” and “What You Gave Me”. Saying she had faithfully captured Tammi’s voice, skilfully imitating her distinctive style and only someone who had worked so intimately with her could possibly have pulled this off. And also as Valerie had probably recorded several of their demos, she was the obvious ‘culprit’. In hindsight, this is irrelevant. It isn’t the first time Motown’s marketing department has stretched the truth. Didn’t The Andantes record with Diana Ross, yet records were released showing “Diana Ross and the Supremes” on the labels? We were none the wiser back then. It’s only in recent times with the growing demand for unreleased material that studio paperwork revealed we had been misled. Having said that, with the “Easy” front sleeve being a painting, fans, like myself, did question Tammi’s involvement in the recordings, although eventually accepted, having seen pictures of the ailing singer in the American press, that a new photo shoot for the project was out of the question. This didn’t affect our enjoyment of the album, despite it being a mixture of sounds. But our hearts went out to Miss Terrell.

While the UK was celebrating Motown’s 10th anniversary in 1970 – and after two and a half years of fighting her illness which entailed several hospital stays, where Marvin was a regular visitor – Tammi Terrell slipped into a coma and died from brain cancer complications on 16 March, a month before her twenty-fifth birthday. Fourteen years later, Marvin Gaye was shot dead by his father on 1 April, a day short of his forty-fifth birthday.

Valerie Simpson: “The chemistry between them was fantastic and while they never had a romance in real life, when they sang together ‘wow’, they were lovers.”

(With sincere thanks to Ludie Montgomery/Vickie Wright’s “The Real Tammi Terrell: My Sister Tommie”. Published by Bank House Books 2005)

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